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Splash! Fall 2011
Course Catalog


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Biological and Medical Science Engineering
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Physical Science Social Science
Visual and Performing Arts Writing, Literature, and Language


Biological and Medical Science

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B1684: Introduction to Neuroprosthetics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Paul Nuyujukian

Learn about the emerging field of neural prosthetics: electronic systems that interface with and connect to the brain and nervous system. Course will contain a brief introduction to neuroscience as well as an overview of current neuroprosthetics. Topics covered will span clinical interfaces to existing commercial systems and research devices.

B1692: To Test or Not to Test: The Ethical Debates of Genetically Inherited Disease
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joseph Masri

If you could find out whether you will develop a disease with no known cure, would you want to know? For the thousands with or without a family history of Huntington’s Disease, they must answer this question and face the consequences of their decision.

Huntington’s Disease is an autosomally dominant neurodegenerative disease for which there are symptomatic treatment options but no known cure. Genetic testing for the disease has lasting effects on the individual, their family and their loved ones.

This course will provide an introduction to the science behind the disease - what causes the disease and how its symptoms manifest. We then develop a framework for understanding how genetic testing applies to parents or children who may have Huntington’s Disease, and utilize this to debate the ethical concerns that arise when screening for inherited disease. If your parents have Huntington’s Disease, would you get tested? If you were going to have children but did not know if you had the disease, would you get tested? Would you have kids if you tested positive? What are the mental, physical and emotional implications of genetic testing within the context of Huntington’s Disease?



Prerequisites
Basic understanding of biology and genetics

B1750: Understand DNA through Lego and games
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Yan Guo, Dawei Lin

DNA is a long molecule that carries the blueprints that build all lives including humans, plants and bacteria. You will learn what it looks like and how it works through Lego building and game playing.

B1609: Hep B: How YOU Can Combat a Major World Health Disparity
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chris Paiji

Presented by members of Stanford Team HBV/Asian Liver Center, come learn the biology/epidemiology about Hepatitis B and find out how you can get involved in fighting a disease that affects 1 in 12 Asian Americans!

B1675: The IMMORTAL Emperor of All Maladies: Cancer
Difficulty: *

You've probably heard or know of someone who has cancer. This class will highlight major advances in cancer research and treatment through the summary of two books: The Emperor of All Maladies and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. And BEST of all, we will have food that prevent cancer!


Prerequisites
None

B1757: Biology and Biotechnology of Your Vegetables
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kyle Taylor

Chances are you’ve eaten something from a plant in the last day. Where did that plant come from? How did it grow and develop? How do we continually adapt them for human use? In this course, we will introduce the plant lifecycle. Then, you will take matters into your own hands and make crosses critical for producing seeds and the next generation of plants. Finally, we will talk about plant biotechnology and how we are continuing to adapt plants for human use.

B1678: It’s All in the Family- How Do We Inherit and Pass On Traits? Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Veena Singla

Some things seem to run in families- the Jonas brothers all have a similar look and musical aptitude. Why do we look like our parents? Why do some brothers and sisters look alike? If you have curly hair, will your children have curly hair?

In this class, explore the basics of genetics, including what it means for a trait to be “dominant” or “recessive,” and how traits are passed from parents to children. Then, put your knowledge to use with a partner in class and see what your baby together might look like!


B1720: The Plant Torture Chamber: A hands-on workshop in plant physiology
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kelly McManus

It's not easy being green... This course will explore some of the fundamental components of plant physiology (aka the study of how plants work) such as photosynthesis, water transport, and gas exchange. We'll introduce a variety of cool lab and field equipment, take measurements, and learn what a thermal camera can tell you about how plants 'sweat'. Enthusiasm and a little familiarity with basic biology and chemistry are all that are required to attend.

B1807: Creatures of the Abyss: Life in the Deep Sea Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Claire Zabel

Learn about the real "Twilight Zone", creatures that live where it is too dark for plants to grow, ancient fish with antifreeze in their blood, hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, whale falls (whole ecosystems that grow around a dead whale, consuming it for years), sharks, the megladon (giant extinct sharks), giant squid, and other amazing organisms that inhabit this dark world.


B1821: Cloning: from plasmids to organisms
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Olga Razorenova

In this class I will introduce the concepts of cloning (cloning of genes, cloning of cells, cloning of organisms) and explain how each of them can be executed. This class will be followed by a fun interactive discussion about the advantages and problems arising in course of genetic manipulations.
The knowledge of what the nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) are would be of help!!!

B1850: Cancer and Stem Cells
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Dena Leeman

Come to this class to learn more about stem cells, cancer, the reasoning behind some of the ways we currently treat cancer, and some new discoveries in the cancer and stem cell fields!

B1892: Lizards of Panama and the Geography of Central America
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Glenn Markov

You will learn about the lizards of Panama, how the lizard tail regenerates after it is pulled off, and about the geography of Central America, so that you too can imagine opportunities to explore and discover the fascinating diversity of flora and fauna around the world.

B1898: Cardiology 101!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kenji Tanabe

The heart beats over 300 million times in the average lifetime. What drives this vital engine in your body, and how does it work to keep you alive? A glimpse into cardiology, a field of medicine.


Prerequisites
General anatomy.

B1793: Real Science - What It Is and How to Spot BS
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Lots of people talk about what "Scientists say" and what is "experimentally proven". We all want to be rational and make good decisions.

But what is science, really? And how do you know when someone is just trying to BS you by throwing around the word "science"? We'll talk about that, and, like real scientists, do some real experiments.

B1615: Diagnose Me: Medical Problem Solving Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Morgan Theis

In this session, the group of the students gets to collectively function as a doctor! This class is based on a popular elective at the medical school called "Student Rounds" in which a more advanced clinical student acts like a patient they saw in the hospital. The group of younger students asks questions to try to figure out the diagnosis. The goal of this course is to introduce students to clinical reasoning and give them a taste of medical school. Basic anatomy, physiology, pathology, and history and physical exam skills will be discussed as questions arise during the case.


Prerequisites
No strict prerequisites, but knowledge of any basic biology, especially the major organs in the body is helpful.

B1676: Stem Cells in Life and Disease - Immortality Inside You
Difficulty: **

Stem cells keep us alive and help us heal throughout our lives, and in some cases they can even regrow entire organs. But when they don't act correctly, there can be serious consequences. Abnormal stem cells might be the cause for diseases ranging from Down syndrome to cancer. How does this happen? We'll cover the very basics about what stem cells are, why we need them, and how losing control over them can lead to serious health problems. Presented by Stanford Biology PhD students.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of introductory biology is recommended (a.k.a. you should know what a cell is).

B1805: The Biology of Slime Molds
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Emerson Glassey

Did you know that Slime Mold, despite its moldy name, is not a Fungus? As an organism capable of inching along like a caterpillar or of pseudopodia, Slime Mold is a truly unique organism. We will learn about the types of Slime Mold and why they are so interesting. We will also talk about the networking abilities of Plasmodial Slime Mold and watch several time lapse videos of Slime Mold in action.

B1806: Getting a “Taste” of Experimental Molecular Biology: DNA Extraction from Strawberries
Difficulty: **

In this section, students will get a basic introduction about the molecule that is the blueprint of life: DNA. After learning about some of its physical and biological properties, we will isolate DNA from strawberries, which you can then take home!

B1842: Protein Engineering and Biomaterials
Difficulty: *

First, students will be introduced to the building blocks of proteins and their heirarchal structures. Second, students will learn how to engineer proteins using computational and recombinant design methods. Third, students will learn about the various methods of protein production. Lastly, we will discuss applications of engineered proteins and protein-based materials.

B1653: Blood and Leukemia
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Aparna Raval

Millions are blood cells are made in our body everyday. During this class we will discuss about different types of blood cells in our body, how they are made and what happens when they do not function properly.

B1682: Ethics of Scientific and Medical Research
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Paul Nuyujukian

Learn about the core ethical ideas that govern all scientific and medical research. Discover the criteria that must be met for medical research and clinical trials. Explore the level of adherence of various forms of scientific research to these core principles and the means of oversight setup to ensure research is conducted in an ethical manner. Additionally, the second half of this course will explore specific topics, examples, and cases; where the ethics of research are non-trivial to evaluate and often accompanied with social controversy.

B1749: The World’s Largest Rodent, Dr Seuss Birds, and Other Amazonian Oddities
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Annie Loggins

Where parrots’ bills can crush bone, monkeys perform deafening choruses, and wild pigs stampede through the underbrush, the Amazon rainforest holds a wealth of amazing creatures. Come meet some funky fauna in this whirlwind introduction based on firsthand experience – no binoculars required!

B1817: Know the Facts: HIV/AIDS
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cody Aros

We will provide the students with an overview of HIV/AIDS and discuss modes of transmission and its associated stigma. The goal of the course is not only to educate youth about the importance of awareness and safe sexual practices, but also to empower them to become further involved with groups that address these exigent issues.


Prerequisites
Students should have an interest in the course topic.

B1639: Ayurveda and Your Body Type
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Raji Lukkoor

Are you a “Spring” body type, a “Summer” body type, or a “Winter” body type? Come find out in this fascinating course titled, “Ayurveda and Your Body Type.”


Prerequisites
none

B1832: Stem Cells, Reprogramming, and Regeneration
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Elizabeth Pollina

Ever wondered why you can't regrow your hand but your pet lizard can? Ever wondered whether some day we could regenerate? Take this class to learn the basics of stem cell biology and cool applications for the future!

B1731: Human Genomics: Our Past, Present, and Future
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alison Nguyen

We will discuss about the one molecular that makes us who we are: DNA! We will learn about how DNA's molecular structure makes it the "code of life", how it is used for biological and medical research, and how there is still much that we don't know (yet) about DNA.


Prerequisites
An interest in the sciences. High school biology and chemistry are recommended but not necessary.

B1764: Molecular motors - life's tiny machines
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Aakash Basu

Molecular motors are among the smallest machines in the universe, and have evolved to play a central role in the story of life on Earth. They are macromolecules that convert chemical energy available from high energy molecules such as ATP into mechanical work. These machines are involved in critical diverse cellular processes such as transport of cargo, generation of forces and replication of DNA. This course will give you a glimpse of the fascinating world of molecular motors: how they evolved, how they function, and perhaps the most interesting aspect of it all - how we discovered them and study them.

B1640: Ayurveda and the Three-Season Diet (Part 2)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Raji Lukkoor

Have you ever heard the expression, “You are what you eat,” and wondered what exactly it means? Can you name some of the locally-grown, seasonal fruits and vegetables are? Come find out in this fascinating course titled, “Ayurveda and the Three-Season Diet.”


Prerequisites
Ayurveda and Your Body Type (Part 1)

B1721: "Braiiinnnsss: the neuroscience of zombies"
Difficulty: **

What would a real-life zombie be like? Why do zombies do what they do? If the zombie- apocalypse were to happen tomorrow, would you have the knowledge to be a survivor? Insights from biology and neuroscience can answer these questions and more! Students will get the chance to see real brains!


B1765: What is Autism?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Kari Berquist

1 in 110 children in the U.S. have an autism spectrum disorder, yet there are many remaining questions surrounding the disorder. This course will discuss the core features and symptoms associated with autism. We will discuss the portrayal of autism in the media, different approaches to treatment, and current research in the field. We will conclude with a discussion of how you can get involved in the field of autism! This course will consist of a lecture and interactive component with prizes.



Prerequisites
None.

B1815: Translational Medicine: Drug Development from Bench to Bedside
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Zachary Katz

Drug development is not just a scientific process. It incorporates a variety of perspectives, from the legal to the economic to the ethical. This course will serve as a three-hour interactive introduction to the state of the biopharmaceutical industry and the drug development process. Rather than simply focusing on how small and large molecules are created to treat the body, we will instead discuss how molecules move through clinical trials, what kinds of considerations are put into the drug development process, and what kinds of opportunities and challenges exist in the future for this fascinating industry.

B1677: The World of Microbes - Bed bugs, germs and other things we can't see...
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Blair Benham-Pyle

Microbes cover every surface of our planet - soil, forests, oceans, and even inside you and me! We are outnumbered. Some microbes are capable of mind control, fuel production, or survival at extreme temperatures. This course will cover what microbes are, where they live, how they survive, and, most importantly, why we care!


Prerequisites
Some exposure to basic biology is suggested, but not required.

B1711: The Crazy Balance of the Natural World
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yari Greaney

How do all the living things in the world fit together? Where do humans fit into the great puzzle of ecology? Through activities and discussion, find out how life works in the big picture.

B1816: The World As We Perceive It
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Richard Yu

The course introduces students how our visual and neural systems affect the way we perceive our world. The course entails topics from cognitive psychology and demonstrations of examples that students can participate in.


Engineering

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E1836: Green Materials (an introduction)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sarah Miller

Interested in green materials? This class will cover current application of cradle to cradle methods in composite materials, the use of life cycle modeling to understand environmental impacts of materials, and some experiments to test material strength!


Prerequisites
None

E1912: An Intro to Digital Signal Processing with Audio Applications
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chris Young

Every wonder what it means for a signal to be digital? How your iPod turns bits into sounds or how exactly to get more bass out of a song? This class will answer these questions by discussing the basics of digital signal processing (DSP). From a historical standpoint, DSP is a relatively new field when compared to other areas of applied mathematics, but is arguably one of the largest driving forces in our modern technology. While the math can be fairly rigorous, we won't focus on the hard stuff and will take a more qualitative approach while also discussing how DSP is applied in audio.


Prerequisites
-Basic trigonometry -Knowing what a summation is is very helpful -An idea of how a computer stores numbers

E1589: Building a Camping Stove Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Trevor Shannon

If you love building stuff and you love camping, then you should build a camping stove!

This class will teach you how to make a functional camping stove out of two aluminum soda cans--a popular design sometimes called the Penny Stove.

Each student will get to make their own stove and see it working by the end of the session. The course will also cover the basics of how a camping stove works.


Prerequisites
Basic hands-on building skills and dexterity.

E1592: Civil and Structural Engineering Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Pallav Agrawal

The course tells students how the fascinating buildings and bridges we see around us are created. It walks them through the entire process, right from the initial inception to the final construction.


Prerequisites
An interest in learning!

E1739: Playing with Circuits: A hands-on electrical engineering laboratory
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Corinne Horn

First, we will examine and discuss basic electrical components such as batteries, resistors, LEDs, breadboards, and capacitors. Motivated students can play with simple sensors such touch sensors, heat sensors, and photo resistors (light sensors). As we test the functionality of these components, we will also cover the engineering concepts driving the observable phenomena.

Then we will start building interactive circuits on breadboards powered by batteries. All students will pair up and build a circuit that lights a string of colored light bulbs ( LEDS) that are either blinking or powered by a button. Additional sensors will be available to play with, and additional projects include building circuits that utilize sensors and react to the environment.


Prerequisites
None

E1778: Prototyping with Arduino!
Difficulty: *

Arduino has become increasingly popular among scientists and DIYers as it bridges programing and actualization in one compact, budget priced package. Check out www.sparkfun.com to watch video tutorials and get an idea of what it can do and come to the class to get your hands on one!


Prerequisites
any kind of programming experience

E1701: A gentle introduction to Nanotechnology and its applications

In this seminar we will introduce the fundamental concepts in nanotechnology through hands-on experiments and demonstrations. Topics discussed include nano-fabrication, applications in consumer products, risks and concerns and the future outlook for nanotechnology.
Be prepared to participate in some really fun small group based activities.


Prerequisites
Current or prior enrollment in a high school Chemistry or physics course

E1754: Guesstimate: The Art of Estimation
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yiyang Li

How many street lights are in Palo Alto? How much data does a 747 filled with DVDs carry? Learn how to make quick, educated approximations to these and other problems through guessing, lying, cross-checking, and other "Street-Fighting" mathematical methods.


Prerequisites
Basic Algebra

E1913: San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge
Difficulty: **
Teachers: michael daly

The class will deliver a non-technical narrative of the design and construction of this emerging engineering marvel. We will use multi-media presentations to cover the theoretical aspects. The goal of the class is to enable you to share with your own people an accurate understanding of why and how this bridge is being built.


Prerequisites
A genuine interest in the subject matter, and a willingness to ask questions if they arise.

E1626: Tame the SAT exam
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Vaibhav Chidrewar

The knowledge of college level vocabulary is very important to solve many SAT questions. Join this class to learn how to build your vocabulary in the most efficient way to crack the SAT.Vocabulary building software developed by me will be introduced to you (It will be distributed free to splash students otherwise it costs $20). Its has many great features which make learning new words fun. Quizzes and revision techniques used in the software ensure that you will never forget the words learned.

E1781: History of Radio, Part 2
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Drew Compston

While we all have come to take for granted the instant access to information made easily available through TV, the internet, and cell phones, this was only made possible after the development of the radio. Yet despite the way radio revolutionized the way people communicated with each other and is still an integral part of our lives even now, few people are familiar with the story behind this amazing invention.

This is part 2 of a 2-part course aiming to rectify that. While the first part will have (hopefully) given you a taste for what it is like to actually DO science, in this part I hope to convey what it is like to DO engineering by telling the story of the engineers who used the earlier scientists’ discoveries to fundamentally change people’s lives by inventing radio. In the process, my goal is to show you why the study of science and engineering is important. Of course, we'll also have time to meet the equally interesting and peculiar engineers that also played a role in developing this innovative technology.

The first course traces the scientific discoveries in electricity and magnetism that made the invention of radio possible, giving context to how science is actually done.


Prerequisites
This is part 2 of a 2-part course (part 1 is S1004 in the Science section), but each course is independent enough that it is possible to only take one or the other if you prefer. However, you will definitely appreciate the subject more if you enroll in both.

E1612: How To: Make a Concrete Canoe
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Justin Tan

What is concrete canoe? What do we do? In this course, we will discuss the design, construction, planning, and racing aspects of concrete canoe.

E1783: Space Communications
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sawson Taheri

This class will cover the basics of electricity and radio communication, with an emphasis on space based radio communication. Learn about: -Electricity -Radio theory -Antennas -Digital communication -How to track and communicate with satellites -Communication with the International Space Station!

Students may get a chance to make their own satellite contact.


Prerequisites
Completion of Beginning Algebra.

E1795: Rockets and satellites: how they work and why they crash
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kenneth Oslund

This course will cover the basics of how satellites and rockets work, the different types, past, present and future designs, and several cases where they failed (often resulting in a very large explosion).

E1841: Flying Robots (aka Unmanned Air Vehicles) Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: zouhair mahboubi

In this session, we'll literally pick through the brains of a small unmanned air vehicle (UAV) in order to understand what sensors, actuators and algorithms allow these modern day robots to fly.

We will also showcase (hardware and videos) UAVs that have been used for various research projects at Stanford.


E1914: Green Construction Projects Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: michael daly

An explanation of the current roles of environmental design and sustainability in ongoing projects. Among the projects highlighted will be the Hetch Hetchy Watger System Improvement Project and California High Speed Rail.
While the class will cover engineering aspects, it is principally in presentations clear to all present.


Prerequisites
An interest in the subject materials

E1605: Mathematical Programming
Difficulty: **
Teachers: FRANCISCO ZARAGOZA

we can revise different kind of interesting topics to make decisions in real world using applied mathematics.
some important algorithms like transporting models
assignment problem
salesman problem
primal problem applied to make decisions in real life
inventories schedule


Prerequisites
previous knowledge of linear equatios knowledge of matrix, invert and traspose and elemental operation with matrix differential calculus

E1614: Air Traffic Management 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Gaurav Nagle

Ever wondered why you were delayed at an airport when the skies were blue? Ever wondered how an aircraft navigates the crowded skies from A to B? Ever wondered how hundreds of flights were grounded during 9/11 in a span of a few hours? Learn it all here!

E1767: Microfluidics 101: Physics and biology on a chip Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Josh Weinstein

Biology has gotten complicated. This isn’t to say it was ever simple. But once upon a time, studying the immune system, the brain, or infectious disease meant asking a few questions about how large numbers of cells looked or behaved under different conditions. Today, biologists are interested in mapping entire systems of diverse protein-coding genes and cell-types, and in making exact, quantitative measurements of each. In this class, you will be introduced to the physics and biology involved in designing, fabricating, and operating devices that do all of this on a coin-sized elastic chip.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of physical mechanics, biology, and chemistry.

E1590: Sewing Circuits
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Katie Dektar

Every year, more objects are integrated with electronics. Crafters have realized this and begun to use electronic components and engineering techniques to add another dimension to their work. Understanding electronics can be useful in craft, and traditional crafts can lend tools for making amazing electronics.

In this class, we will be creating our own soft electronics. We will introduce basic sewing, basic electronics, and give you a chance to design and create your own project using LEDs, snap-switches, home-made soft buttons, and batteries wired together with conductive thread. Feel free to bring your own components and scraps, too!


Prerequisites
Can you thread a needle? Then you can take this class!

E1766: Build your own Mousetrap Car!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ken Soong

Come and learn physics and engineering with your hands as you compete against your fellow classmates to design and build the best mousetrap car! Each student will receive a basic kit to build their very own mousetrap car, which we will race at the end of the class. Ambitious students can also bring in their own components (wheels, axels, gears, etc.) to gain the extra edge.

E1893: Green Tech and Blue Skies: Sustainable Energy Technologies
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Heather Beagley, _ _

We’ll compare solar, wind, biofuel and nuclear energy sources on the basis of technology infrastructure, source availability, cost, and potential negative
externalities.


E1915: Principles of Construction Management
Difficulty: **
Teachers: michael daly

An introduction to professional construction management, intended for people with a possible future in this field.


Prerequisites
Basic understanding of general issues related to the subject --the class will not be technical, but does cover a lot of material.

E1657: Motorcycles and Mechanisms
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joe Johnson

http://www.rcycle.com/Ken_Fisher_Honda_305_Dream_068_cropped_op_800x512.jpg


Prerequisites
Interest in how things work

E1851: Learn How To Solder!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Mitch Altman

Anyone can learn the useful and fun skill of soldering! Once you see how easy it is, you can make anything with electronics, as well as repair things rather than throw them away. We will use a very simple blinky-light badge that everyone will make and take home to show your friends! And everyone will get theirs working.

I will also give an overview of electronics, and how it works.


E1874: Carbon-based Electronics: Going Organic!

In this class, we will look at a class of materials known as organic semiconductors. These are carbon-based materials that can conduct electricity and are used for transistors, LEDs and even solar cells. You will learn about what make these materials conductive, how the devices operate and compete in some logic games!


Hobbies

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H1633: Zen and the Art of Bicycle Maintenance Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Tom Kabat

Bring your bike to a course intended to help both of you align your functions in harmony with nature. We will skim the surface of various philosophies and apply them to bike maintenance in a hands-on interactive practical and whimsical session. We hope to center ourselves and our wheels, adjust our attitudes and our shifters, lean on each other and our brakes. We hope to find the proper position both for ourselves on the bikes and for the bikes in the world.


Prerequisites
Bring a bike that needs to be brought into harmony with you.

H1733: How to break dance
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yujun Wu

Teach some fundamental skills in break dance like top rock, six steps and some freeze. Finally, just rock with music !


Prerequisites
N/A

H1745: How to make fun: game design concepts Full!

Groups of students will be provided with game kits and asked to design and create a game. We will then come together to play each other's games, and discuss the theory of game design and game mechanics.

H1789: No-Sew T-shirt Transformations Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: LeeAnn Perry

Learn several ways to transform a boring old t-shirt into a fresh, trendy, and unique top, all without sewing a stitch!


Prerequisites
Bring your own t-shirt to modify

H1862: Fabric Art - making necklace with sheer fabric flowers
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jingjing Liu

You will make a fashionable necklace out of different fabrics.

You will first need to cut multiple pieces of flowers or petals from the fabric. Then glue layers of fabrics together into flowers. And finally fix them onto a fabric chains into a necklace.

All materials will be provides in class unless you want to bring your own fabrics. Also we will try to provide scissors but please bring one if it is convenient for you.

Come to make your new fabric necklace to match up the outfit for this coming fall.


Prerequisites
None

H1800: Advanced Knots
Difficulty: *

Sure, you can tie a square knot and a bowline, but there’s much more out there. Come learn to craft the butterfly knot, the icicle hitch, the zeppelin bend and whatever else we can teach you in 45 minutes.

H1665: Dance for Fitness!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bailey Farrell

Dancing is a wonderful way to keep your body in shape while having fun! In this class we will learn the choreography and perform 2-3 dances. Possible songs include: Moves like Jagger, More (Usher), I Wanna Go, Zuit Suit Riot, Year without Rain, Dynamite, DJ Got us Falling in Love Tonight, and many more. Come ready for a mental (choreography) and physical (doing the moves!) workout, with a positive attitude and desire to have fun!

H1709: Beginning Karate Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jillynne Quinn

This class will cover basic blocks, punches, and kicks in Shotokan karate. There will be no sparring. This is a class for beginners. No previous experience in any marital art is required. Please wear appropriate clothing (flat shoes and loose clothing).

H1710: The Science of Cooking Full!
Difficulty: *

Cooking demystified! Learn how to make scientifically accurate meals and snacks (using knowledge of their chemical components) and enjoy them at the end of class as a bonus.



H1753: Close-up Magic Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brendan Cohen

Learn to do some close-up magic with cards, coins, and every day objects. You’ll be able to impress your friends!

H1826: Manicures 101
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kaitlyn Osborn

Want to be able to paint your nails like a professional? We'll discuss and practice the art of nail-painting and by the end of class, you'll be a nail expert.

H1697: 7 (or 14) Ways to Meet the Devil: Search the Seven Sins
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Dustin Fink

Sloth, Gluttony, Lust, Wrath, Greed, Envy, Pride. Where do these seven deadly sins come from? What is sin and why does it trouble us so? Come discuss and investigate these seven aspects of the soul, their history and their presence among us. Look into Dante's hell and also learn about the new seven sins. Time permitting, there will be a trip to the Cantor Arts Center to gaze into Rodin's "Gates of Hell."

H1897: Japanese (Riichi) Mahjong
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Russell Chou

Learn how to play Japanese (Riichi) Mahjong, NOT Mahong Solitaire

H1630: Learn to Knit
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sarah Case

Learn the basic skills needed to start a knitting project! We will go over how to begin, the knit stitch, and how to finish.

H1637: Manga Based Anime
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Raj Singh

This class is offered to students who have an interest in manga based anime and would like to learn how to analyze and breakdown two famous series Bleach and Death Note. We will spend most of our time viewing important episodes of the series. It's a really fun class and it's open to all!


Prerequisites
A general background knowledge of anime

H1729: Activism 101

Are you interested in activism, advocacy, politics, international issues, or human rights? If yes, come to this class, taught by Stanford STAND, one of campus' most active human rights groups. We will go over some of the issues we focus on, what we do, and what you can do to get involved at your school.

H1664: Learning origami over the Internet
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Al Sweigart

Origami is a fun, artistic hobby. Complicated folding diagrams used to be the only way to learn how to make the more advanced models. But today, YouTube videos make learning much easier by showing actual people making the folds.

This class will go over making a basic crane, a T-Rex, and a cat models in person, and also introduce students to the software at http://coffeeghost.net/origami/ to learn how to make other models from Internet instructions.


Prerequisites
None.

H1895: Vocaloid: The Electronic Singing Sensation
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Russell Chou

Have you heard of supercell? Do you know who Hatsune Miku is? Explore Japanese MAD’s and the virtual singing idol software Vocaloid and how they have impacted Japanese (and now the world's) popular culture, as well as the vehicle for such expressions of creativity, NicoNicoDouga.

H1698: 7 (or 14) Ways to Meet the Devil: Sin and Soul
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Dustin Fink

Sloth, Gluttony, Lust, Wrath, Greed, Envy, Pride. Where do these seven deadly sins come from? What is sin and why does it trouble us so? Come discuss and investigate these seven aspects of the soul, their history and their presence among us. Look into Dante's hell and also learn about the new seven sins. Time permitting, there will be a trip to the Cantor Arts Center to gaze into Rodin's "Gates of Hell."

H1727: Sketching Faces
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Teresa Nguyen

Sketching with charcoal can be a powerful thing! This class will introduce and teach you to draw faces, with detailed shading techniques. Every student would be able to create his or her own masterpiece!

H1688: Learn to Juggle
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Charlie Dunn

Juggling is an ancient tradition that is commonly used to entertain, but is also a great way to improve your hand-eye coordination and change the way the neurons in your brain make connections. More importantly, it's a great way to impress your friends. Students will learn the 3 ball cascade juggling pattern and see a performance from members of Stanford's juggling club, Down with Gravity. Prior experience in juggling is completely unnecessary, but we will teach to all levels.

H1849: Kickin' it at Splash--An Introduction to Kenpo Karate!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joe Getsy

Did you ever want to learn karate? Now you can! This class will be a great way to learn self-defense, get some exercise and have fun! We'll go over punches, kicks, blocks and more! Please wear loose-fitting athletic clothing.

H1894: What the heck is Touhou?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Russell Chou

You might have heard of Touhou Project, a series of fan-made shoot-em-up games that have taken the anime-comic-game community by storm, racking up hits on websites such as Pixiv, NicoNicoDouga, and conventions like Comiket. Come learn about why it is the #1 most popular fan franchise in internet history!

H1735: Balloon Animals (or balloon anything else)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Dena Leeman

In this fun, relaxing class we’ll go over the basics of making balloon animals and then you’ll spend the rest of the time making whatever you want out of balloons! Come with ideas of what you’d like to make— no matter what it is, you can try to make it!

H1712: An Abridged Introduction to Bridge
Difficulty: *

Bridge is a popular and exciting card game which tests your ability to communicate with other players, strategize, and keep track of probabilities. We will teach you the rules of bridge and give you a chance to practice playing the game with experienced Stanford students.

H1896: Origami roses 1 Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Russell Chou

Medium-difficulty origami roses. Some folding experience would be good.

H1613: Nutrition Labeling + introduction to Chi Quong exercise
Difficulty: *
Teachers: May To

Nutrition Label reading + introduction to Chi Quong exercise
Come and learn what you are eating!!
We will explore label reading on packaged foods - fresh, frozen, canned, as a meal, desserts, cereals and more.
There will be samples and hands on practise. At the end, let’s have some fun and strength a little. There will be a short but fun session on introduction to Chi Quong for health and everyday exercise. It is simple and easy to do.


H1693: Style Your Sole - Shoe Decorating Workshop
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Laurel Fuentes

Have you ever wanted a pair of shoes designed just for you? In this class, we will provide ideas and materials for you to decorate your own pair of shoes. Using paints, sharpies, and fabrics, you can transform your shoes to express yourself. You can also bring your favorite, but old pair of shoes to be refurbished!

What To Bring: A pair of shoes (new or old) that you want to transform into a work of art.

H1776: Introduction to Photography
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Noah Zallen

Curious about photography, but don't know how to start?
Like taking pictures, but wish you could capture your ideas better?
Want to be the next Ansel Adams or Andy Warhol?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, then this is the class for you!

Student's will learn from scratch how to conceive, compose, and capture photographs that they will be proud to show off to their friends and family. The class will be 1 part indoors, and 2 parts outdoor practice. Classes are limited to 8 students, so every student gets personalized attention and instruction. No experience required what so ever.

What to bring? To ensure that each student gets the most out of the class, please bring your own camera, any kind other than an iPhone is totally fine.

Don't have a camera? No problem, the teacher will provide his own camera for those student's who don't bring a camera to share.


Prerequisites
No experience required

H1801: Understanding Diplomacy through Wargaming
Difficulty: **

Much of historical European politics would have made more sense if you were there at the time. This class will give you a chance to recreate those politics. Take command of countries in a simple war game and learn about the balance of power by seeing it play out in action.

H1866: Learn to Swing Dance!
Difficulty: *

Come and learn how to Swing dance! We will start with the very basics, so no dance experience is required. You also do not need a partner. It'll be an incredibly fun and active class, learning and dancing all at once!

H1679: Mail Swap and ATCs - the Joy of Opening The Mailbox (And Finding Something In There)
Difficulty: *

Learn all about the mail swapping community and how to become one of us! Discover the gradually forgotten fun and beauty of snail mail, and join us in keeping it alive! You will get to make one (or more if you wish) Artist Trading Card (a miniature art form) and enjoy swapping on the spot! For art and craft lovers - the limit is the sky! (In the size of a poker card)


Prerequisites
A passion for art and craft Creativity Bring a pair of scissors and some glue Bring your own drawing equipment if you have any particular preferences Most importantly, bring some waste paper from home that is not dirty (e.g. old receipts, movie tickets, candy wrappers)

H1699: Learning Cricket
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Aditya Todi

We will be teaching interested student about the game of cricket. Very little is known about the sport of cricket in the U.S, even though it is rapidly growing here. Cricket is a game which has wide following and it is fun to watch if you understand the rules. We will be teaching students the rules, format and anything and everything about cricket. We will be drawing on baseball and how it is similar and relevant to cricket.


Prerequisites
Should be enthusiastic about learning!

H1719: Practical self-defense
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sasha Brownsberger

Self-defense is a rather overused term that has come to me anything related to fending off hostile aggressors. Unfortunately, many self-defense lessons miss a crucial part of maintaining personal safety: recognizing and dealing with a threat before it becomes serious. This class will focus on learning a set of relatively straightforward techniques for dealing with dangerous situations. We will cover the following topics roughly in the order they appear since this represents the gradual escalation of a threat (so hopefully if you do the first few well, you need not be as concerned with the latter):
-how to diffuse threats before they manifest (eg-body posture, behavior),
-how to identify when a dangerous situation arises (eg-how to identify a potential aggressor, gauging at what distance they are actually threatening) -how to extricate oneself from a dangerous situation before it escalates (eg-effective evasion techniques, when it is safe to run away)
-what to do if combat breaks out (simple and effective combat techniques, how to open up the opportunity to flee)
-how to handle a few specific scenarios (eg-dealing with a weapon, being seized)
-If time permits, and if the students are interested, we might also go over some striking techniques (though actually becoming proficient would take far more time than we have available)
Also, I am open to student suggestions, though bare in mind that if an activity is unsafe, we won't be doing it.
Nothing we do will involve full combat, and no former training is required, though understand that some risk is always inherent in this sort of training. Provided all participants conduct themselves appropriately, I do not foresee any major problems, but please recognize that accidents can happen. That said, I will do my utmost to ensure everyone has a safe and enjoyable experience, and I believe that students will be safer in the future.



Prerequisites
As mentioned already, we will be performing activities that involve some inherent risk, risks that can be severely exacerbated by reckless or careless behavior. Since safety is my highest priority, I ask that anyone who is not willing or able to conduct themselves appropriately over this hour and a half of class not participate. But other than that, this class is open to anyone (regardless of past training) who would find the subject interesting.

H1769: Zumba
Difficulty: *

Zumba is an aerobic/dance workout to music. We will do some fun routines!


Prerequisites
None!

H1771: Learn to Slackline!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Melissa Galinato

In this course, you will learn the basics behind slacklining. What is slackling? What do you need in order to slackline? How do you set up a slackline? These are just some of the questions you will be able to answer after taking this brief course. You may also get the chance walk on a real slackline (with assistance as needed). Come join us to learn a great way to relax and socialize while getting some exercise!


Prerequisites
For safety reasons, those who wish to slackline should not have any current injuries, especially leg, knee, or ankle injuries.

H1828: Overhauling a Bicycle Hub Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Michael McLaren

I will give a hands-on demonstration of how to overhaul the hub on the rear wheel of a bicycle, and discuss how the hub works to allow a bicycle wheel to spin smoothly. If there is still time, I will discuss other basic bike repairs, such as replacing a wheel spoke or replacing a bike chain.


Prerequisites
Shouldn't be afraid to get a little grease on your hands!


Life Skills

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L1600: Business Etiquette
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Tina Yau

Course on appropriate business attire and conduct for various business occasions, including interviews, meetings, and meals.

L1823: Mediating your Life - Conflict Resolution with Nonviolent Communication
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Teresa Rose

Would you like to be at choice about the way you handle conflict, for everyone to feel heard, and to come to a solution that everyone agrees to? Then come attend this mediation class based on Nonviolent Communication, created by international peacemaker Marshall Rosenberg.

L1730: Lessons on Nonviolence
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tim Huang

Gandhi. Martin Luther King Jr. Cesar Chavez. The Dalai Lama. These great figures all have one thing in common - they practiced nonviolence. In this course, we'll ask the question: what is nonviolence? Drawing on the examples of the great leaders above, you'll explore, learn, and apply the principles of nonviolence (what Gandhi called "Ahimsa"). Together, we'll envision a more peaceful, loving world and work to transform ourselves and our community for the better!


Prerequisites
An open mind and heart!

L1616: Intro to Mock Trials Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Thia Konda

Intro to Mock trials for those who are interested in the courtroom strategies and opening statements for trial. We will be discussing how to brief a legal case and how to present WINNING courtroom arguments.


Prerequisites
Beginning Level Mock Trial For LEGAL MINDS

L1824: Cooking Without A Kitchen
Difficulty: *

Learn to make fun, simple, and tasty grilled cheese sandwiches and chocolate cake without a stove or oven. Perfect for future dorm life.

L1844: Achieving Wild Self-Actualization Through Lifehacking
Difficulty: **
Teachers: A B

You will leave the class more effective at living. You will leave this class with a set of tools that will dramatically increase your ability to fulfill your potential.

The class will teach you how to hack life. Topics covered will include learning optimization, speed reading, social media enhancement, outsourcing lessons, health related hacks, methodologies for productivity, frameworks for behavior change, processes for improved thinking, technologies to assist daily life, technique and habits that will change your life.

Join this class if you're willing to take your life to the next level.




Prerequisites
An desire for self-improvement.

L1649: The Value of Values
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Somik Raha

Students will examine their deepest held values, share stories that exemplify them, and learn to draw value diagrams to communicate their values to their friends and family.

L1660: Forget Goals, Let's Craft A Vision! Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tim Huang

In this course, you'll create a comprehensive, personal vision for your life that will motivate you to fulfill your deepest aspirations. Alongside your personal vision, you will also craft a world vision, a wish list for what type of world you want to live in 50 years from now. With both inspired visions in hand, you'll learn ways to put them into action - making your dreams into a reality!


Prerequisites
An open mind, a willingness to learn, and a desire to achieve your dreams and grow as a person!

L1794: Justice - What's the Right Thing to Do?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: David Carreon

Bank bailouts. Stealing to feed your hungry kid. Lying to save Jews in your basement. Waterboarding. What's right and what's wrong? And how do we know?

This will be a crash course in Ethics, the rigorous discipline of determining what's right. This lost science will be critical for anyone who will have to make decisions in their life.

I'm modeling this course after the enormously popular class and book taught by Michael Sandel at Harvard (Google my course title).

L1814: Activism Now!
Difficulty: **

What does it mean to "get involved?" Why do people protest? What do we mean by "social justice?" We will answer these questions by exploring broadly what it means to be an activist. We will share relevant historical experiences of past community organizers, as well as our own experiences with activism at Stanford. Our focus will be on youth activism and community organizing around issues of race, class, gender identity, sexuality, and educational heritage.

Note: we will strive to make this course a safe space for all experiences, backgrounds, and perspectives. We hope that anyone who signs up for the course will strive toward the same goal.

L1819: Perils of the Tech Startup World...
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Katherine Dickey

Want to know the ups and downs of working in a tech start-up....before you join one? This class will explore the unique Silicon Valley tech start-up experience, the good, the bad, and the ugly.

L1588: How to Save a Life (CPR, First Aid, AED, Lifeguarding)
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Thien Che

An introductory class to Basic Life Support techniques to save a life in emergency situations.

L1648: Making Good Decisions
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Somik Raha

Students will learn how to judge if they've made good decisions. They will also learn how to help themselves, their family and friends improve the quality of their decisions.

L1811: Make Everyday Thanksgiving: The Attitude of Gratitude!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tim Huang

Did you know that gratitude can rewire your brain and behavior for the better? Did you also know that gratitude can help you deal with stress in school and transform your social life? Yes, this is gratitude, and it's great! In this class, you'll learn about the power of gratitude to change your life and increase your happiness! We'll look at scientific research, discuss all things gratitude, and engage in a few thankfulness exercises that will be useful in your everyday life. Thank you! Arigato! Gracias! Merci! Danke! Asante!


Prerequisites
An open mind and desire to learn!

L1813: So you wanna travel?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Marco Massenzio

As an Electronics PhD I have worked in four countries and visited countless all over the world.
If you have a passion for CS / Science, but still would like to experience different cultures, you don't need to give it up to become a Marketing exec or an Investment Banker.

In this short class I'll give you a few 'top tips' as how to deal with those pesky Europeans, how to figure out which part of the world you'd like to spend some time and work, and, generally, how to put a CS degree to good use!

L1595: Chocolate Food of the Gods
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Howard Peters

A fun talk explores the history, chemisitry, biochemistry and trivial connectin of chocolate. Some samples are provided to attendees for taste comparison.. A free drawing will be held at the end for some free chocolate items. ..Must stay to the bitter end...
(Talk has been give around the country and on cruise ships)

L1855: Quick and Dirty Calculations: Solving the Impossible (a.k.a. “Fermi Problems”)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Tony Li

How many blades of grass are on a typical suburban lawn? How much water do you use over a lifetime? How much does the U.S. population spend on gas each year?

Do these questions seem impossible to answer, or nearly so? You can’t count every blade of grass or keep track of every drop of water (well, you can try, but I bet you have better things to do). In this class, we’ll learn how to get quick and dirty answers to problems like the ones above, using what are called “back of the envelope” estimates. In doing so, we’ll learn about more than just simple estimation. We’ll figure out how to solve problems with very little information, just by drawing on what you already know. We’ll get a real feel for incredibly big and small numbers. And, even for unfamiliar problems we don’t know the answers to, we’ll pick up the tools to tell the difference between what is reasonable, and what is totally ridiculous.


Prerequisites
Exposure to exponents (powers) and the metric system. We’ll review! By no means do you have to be an expert -- it just makes the learning process easier if you’ve seen these things before.

L1916: Study Skills & Time management
Difficulty: **

In this course, we will cover some simple techniques and strategies to study and learn new material quickly, and also how to manage time.

Students today are exposed to lot of new concepts across various subjects and it is critical to develop a style of learning that works best for each individual student. A skill that goes hand in hand with study skills is Time Management which we will also cover.

Students will organize themselves into teams and play simple games to take home the concepts they learn in this short course.

L1661: Everything you know is wrong: Psychology of Decision-Making and Communication
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Amy Estersohn

This class will cover some of the shortcuts our brains use to help us make everyday decisions, from what we buy at the store to which treatments doctors choose to how we decide to take risks. We'll learn through games and simulations, so bring your strategy face to the table.

This class is intentionally listed as a 7-12 class-- older students may appreciate more of the economic theory and statistics of the games that the younger students may win. This class is also pitched at an introductory level.

I offered this class at Spring 2011 Splash, so if you have taken this class before, you may find it repetitive!


Prerequisites
1. A brain. 2. 10+ years of life experience. 3. Enjoy playing games and potentially winning prizes.

L1662: Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me When I Was Your Age
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jack Singal

Your parents, teachers, counselors, and the media have all given you their perspective on how to navigate this world, in order to find success, professionally and personally. In this class I will give you my perspective, as someone who is old enough to look back but young enough to remember.



L1717: The Absolute Basics of Cooking
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Alyssa Trevelyan

A hands-on introduction to cooking for those with absolutely no idea what to do in a kitchen.Rather than focus on learning specific recipes, this class will teach the basic skills needed to make any recipe - chopping, frying, boiling, etc. Cooking for yourself can be easy and fast, and it's much cheaper and healthier than eating out. Come learn how!


L1845: Road Less Traveled: Why and How to Take a Gap Year
Difficulty: *

Ever dream of traveling? Checking out fun jobs or internships? Volunteering or working around the world? Celebrating Carnaval in Peru or backpacking through Thailand?

Talk to two guys who each deferred college for a year and one girl who took a semester off high school about their very different adventures before entering Stanford this year. We'll talk briefly about what we did, why we did it, and how to plan your own adventures, and then we'll open this up into a discussion.

L1880: Your Energy Field: Smooth it out, make it sparkle
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Lenore Urbani

We will talk about the energy field around our bodies called the aura. How far does it extend, is it uniform, bumpy, cold, hot, what colors are in it? How well can you think when your aura changes? How do you feel when your aura moves? We will learn skills to adjust our aura to maximize our energy and to enhance clear thinking and feeling.

L1759: Public Speaking: Why the fear?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Fanuel Muindi

According to some national surveys, fear of public speaking ranks among Americans' top dreads, surpassing fear of flying, fear of terrorism, and often the fear of death itself! Imagine that! Virtually everyone gets nervous before speaking in public but as it turns out, one can learn a few tips to quench their fear of public speaking. In this short class, you will learn about (1) the irrational fear of public speaking -
(2) tips to improve your public speaking skills
(3) the importance of practicing

This class will be highly interactive and as such, student participation is a top item on the menu. If interested in this class, please bring a 1 minute speech about yourself.

Don't worry! The class environment will be super friendly such that all can fully engage in the activities.

The reality is that you will have to talk in public one day. Start preparing now!


Prerequisites
Bring a 1 minute speech about yourself! (name, where you are from, something cool about you, why you are attending splash, and what you want to do in the future (college, jobs etc). 1 minute max!

L1881: Negotiations 101: Getting More of What You Want
Difficulty: *
Teachers: James Gao

Negotiation is a part of everyday life. Whether it's smoothing things out with a friend, deciding what movie to watch, or convincing your parents to buy you a llama, you need negotiation skills.

This course will teach you basic negotiation tools that will help you achieve your goals and get more out of life.

L1911: Astrobiology: Science and the Soul
Difficulty: **

Today, the majority of scientists are specialized in a small part of the natural world and we often miss the big picture and the magnificence of the interaction among the parts that make up the whole. Without understanding the interconnectedness of life, we don’t know how we are affecting the connections and no community can exist without a unifying story. The problem is not specialization but isolation. Astrobiology is the study of life as we know it (and as we don’t know it), how it originated, how it has evolved and how it has been distributed in the Universe.

L1758: Event Planning For Teens
Difficulty: *

Students will learn about planning school activities and the importance of being organized and working as a team in order to create a successful event. Planning a school dance, Junior and Senior Prom or sitting on the yearbook committee or planing your 16th birthday. The basics can be applied to all events.

L1779: Personal Training Boot Camp
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cenaan Kelley

This course will deliver a total body workout through bootcamp style training, giving teens a chance learn about health, fitness and nutrition in an excerise enviornment.

Teens will learn how to strengthen their mind and body in a healthy way, improving the quality of their life.



Prerequisites
Teens must be ready to workout. Wear comfortable clothes and shoes that enable exercise.

L1879: The Art of Chilling: Traditions from India
Difficulty: *

In this course, we will explore the Indian traditions of chilling and relaxation. The ritual methodologies in the preparation of such things as meditation rooms, hookah, and seating, which seem unnecessary to many in Western culture, will be explained, taught, and analyzed.

This is an interesting class for anyone who wishes to learn more about Indian culture, or simply destressing in general.


Prerequisites
None.

L1918: Introduction to Structure Thinking
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Petr Johanes

How does a building stand on its own? How do you break down large or complicated problems? Can you do this the same way in math as in literature? Can you then apply these techniques to your life?

The answer is absolutely yes! In this course, you learn about structure thinking, or reducing any given topic to its basic components. Of course, you also learn how to use that in every area of your life. We are going to look at structure thinking in math, art, politics, economics, spirituality, design, engineering, and your own life. If you want to experience a new style of thinking, improve your way of thinking, or want to completely re-think your life, look no further!


Prerequisites
Excitement!


Lunch

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L1909: Lunch Period
Difficulty: None
Teachers:

Enjoy a break for lunch with your friends! Please register for at least one lunch period.

L1910: Lunch Period
Difficulty: None
Teachers:

Enjoy a break for lunch with your friends! Please register for at least one lunch period.


Mathematics and Computer Science

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M1641: Game Theory!
Difficulty: **

What does a Magic square have in common with tic-tac-toe? How do you play Nim? How can you win Hackenbush? How can you deal with Hackenbush addiction? We will answer all these game theory questions in exciting ways (well, perhaps not the last one!)

M1691: Inter-reader Reliability: The Chocolate Edition
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jessica Faruque

Ever wanted to learn statistics while trying to be a chocolate snob? Here's your opportunity! In this class, we'll gather data on your expert opinions on a variety of chocolates, and then perform statistical analyses on the data. We'll see if you and your classmates agree or disagree in your tastes, and determine how meaningful our results are! We'll also briefly go over some of the other ways that researchers use these statistics.

M1797: Magic of Binary Numbers
Difficulty: **

Come learn the magic of binary numbers! We will explore 1's and 0's in an interactive environment. By the end of class, you will: know why 10 = 1010, be able to perform a magic card trick, and have a piece of binary artwork!

M1858: COMAP Mathematical Contest in Modeling Training Session
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Spann

The COMAP High School Mathematical Contest in Modeling challenges a team of four students to write an applied mathematics paper in just 36 hours. In this class we’ll learn how to use our knowledge of mathematics to tackle open-ended problems that have no textbook solution. The class will be divided into two parts: in the first hour we’ll quickly explain what the contest is and how to enter it for those who haven’t participated before and we’ll let the students who have done the contest discuss their experiences. In the second hour of the class we’ll look at specific examples of former problems to get a feel for how to turn these multifaceted questions into something we can approach in a systematic manner. We'll be using a different old problem case study than last spring's Splash class, so there will be new material even if you were here last Splash. Even if you don't take this class, you should find some friends and register for the contest, which is a couple weeks after Splash.


M1804: Augmented Reality: Invisible worlds
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jacob Ervin

Augmented Reality is a new technology that lets people overlay media such as pictures, movies or even 3D models on top of everyday objects IE magazines or posters.

In this class you will see some examples of professional AR from Lego and other companies and get to see how they are created. At the end of the class you will get a chance to create your very own Augmented Reality experience!


Prerequisites
Basic computer and web skills.

M1596: Problem of Twelve Balls
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Dima Kamalov

We will try to tell apart one ball slightly lighter or heavier than the other eleven, in three uses of a scale.


Prerequisites
Some logic/combinatorics experience (not very much taught in schools, but if you've enjoyed solving logic puzzles and/or counting problems, you'll be fine)

M1681: Introduction to Artificial Intelligence
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Peter Pham

This course will provide a broad overview and understanding of the underpinnings of established artificial intelligence techniques. In addition, we will develop a simple AI algorithm for one or two specific problems as a class if time permits.


Prerequisites
A strong background in high school math and or programming is preferred. However, you are welcome to come if you do not feel like you have the requisite background. I will try to explain as many fundamental concepts as possible. Please understand that there may be things I do not have time to explain.

M1774: Boolean gates and digital circuit logic
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Roy Frostig

The hardware in modern computers offers a grab-bag of simple logical and arithmetic operations --- like the "add two numbers" operation or the "remember this value" operation --- as building blocks for creating the computer's more sophisticated tasks, including the task of executing software programs.

Each of these simple operations is created by connecting together even simpler components called Boolean gates. These Boolean gates are functions that take two input bits and produce one output bit --- very simple animals. In fact, Boolean gates are finally simple enough that we can use electrical current and semiconducting materials to build them. This is how all of our computational tasks can eventually be carried out by actual physical machines.

In this course, we'll learn how Boolean gates are built, and how to use them to make some of the simple operations: adders, multiplexers, and simple memory.



Prerequisites
Some notion of the binary number system. It is sufficient to have read and understood the "Counting in binary" section of the "Binary numeral system" article on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_numeral_system#Counting_in_binary.

M1642: Probability and Statistics Paradoxes
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kris Sankaran

Even in introductory probability theory and statistics, paradoxes abound. We'll encounter some of these counterintuitive results in an informal and interactive setting.

For example, we'll discuss the classic Monty Hall, gambler's ruin, and St. Petersburg problems along with Simpson's Paradox.

In the process, we'll begin to see how probability and statistics approach the rigorous quantification and understanding of uncertainty and randomness. And hopefully we'll all have fun too.


Prerequisites
We'll develop all the probability / statistics ideas from scratch, but some mathematical background / inclination will be useful for following the overall exposition and some specific details (for example, summing an infinite geometric series will come up when discussing mathematical expectation).

M1782: Adversarial World: Game Theory In Real World Problems
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Christie Brandt

Game theory isn't about chess or checkers. Many world problems, from splitting up household chores to nuclear disarmament to segregation, can be seen as the interactions of "selfish agents": people acting to benefit themselves and not necessarily the common good.
This course introduces some of the fundamental concepts and games of game theory and some of the real-world situations they relate to. We will play out the games interactively and discuss them mathematically--then talk about when and why game theorists get it wrong and real-life behavior doesn't reflect the models. Topics include Nash equilibrium, prisoner's dilemma, ultimatum game, tragedy of the commons, and more. Depending on class interest, topics can include segregation models, rationality paradoxes, and network contagion.


Prerequisites
Some mathematical knowledge including basic probability. (The mathematical models we use require probability to reason about what an opponent might do) No knowledge of game theory is assumed.

M1802: Origami Math Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrea Hawksley

This class goes into the math behind the popular past-time of origami folding.

Students will learn several basic origami axioms and how to put them together in order to accurately trisect an arbitrary angle.

This class will be more about math than about folding "cool" models.


Prerequisites
Geometry - You should at least be familiar with how to tell if two triangles are congruent. Algebra - You should be familiar with quadratic equations and parabolas.

M1905: Computational Biology
Difficulty: **

How can we use computers to understand biology? In particular, we will discuss the modern day challenges of understanding biological mysteries. You will also learn how to discover relationships between genes using computational techniques.


Prerequisites
In the last 10 years, the amount of biological and health data has exploded. As of 2005, even a fifteen year old kid armed with a cheek swab, a computer, and the internet was able to track down his biological father. Scientists, now armed with a simple laptop, are able to ask amazing biological and health-related questions. Students will be introduced to biological resources that have been formed in the last few years, as well as different ways that people use them to further research. We will also learn about some of the different types of breakthroughs that exist in the realm of computational biology, from the famous to the weird. We will also learn about many of the technologies that make these resources possible, as well as other strange ways they have been used. No knowledge of computer science is required. We will also discuss data visualization and interpretation.

M1907: Prove It with Induction!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jacob Hurwitz

Mathematical induction is one of three key methods of proof, and is a powerful tool for every mathematician. Its most basic use is in the proofs of identities such as $$0+1+2+3+\cdots+n=\frac{n(n+1)}{2}$$, but its full power extends far beyond that, into all realms of mathematics. Induction can even be used to prove that all pigs are yellow*.

*Note: It is not actually true that all pigs are yellow. The proof has a hidden flaw in it. Can you figure it out? Take our class and give it a try!


Prerequisites
An interest in learning the art of mathematical proofs.

M1674: Advanced Javascript
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Charles Chen

Javascript is much more than a language for dynamic websites. We will explore in intricate detail its prototype inheritance model, its model for asynchronous i/o and design patterns for sustainable development. Further, we apply these concepts to create a server written in Javascript with the node.js framework.


Prerequisites
Course will move very quickly and familiarity with programming languages, object-oriented programming and general concepts of computer networking will be assumed.

M1803: Fold a Giant Hyperbolic Paraboloid
Difficulty: **

The hyperbolic paraboloid is a special geometric surface that looks a bit like a Pringles chip.

We'll spend the first portion of the class discussing the mathematics of this surface, and the remainder folding it.

We'll start off practice folding a smaller version, before folding giant versions out of 3 foot squares of paper.

You will get more out of this class if you are familiar with parabolas, hyperbolas, and curvature, but as most of the class will be spent folding, don't be afraid to take it without math background.

M1906: Infinitely Many Proofs of Infinitely Many Primes!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jacob Hurwitz

How many primes are there? INFINITELY MANY! How many different ways can you prove that? INFINITELY MANY! Unfortunately, Splash isn’t infinitely long, so we’ll only have time to cover $$\infty - 1$$ ways.


Prerequisites
Previous exposure to basic proof methods will prove helpful. As such, if you are unfamiliar with the Principle of Mathematical Induction, you should take "Prove It with Induction!" You definitely need to know what a prime number is, and it would really help if you understand terms like “greatest common denominator” and “modular arithmetic.”

M1707: Vectors and Matrices
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Will Monroe

High school math introduces two of the most useful ideas in mathematics: matrices and vectors. But why, exactly, are these concepts useful? It's hard to tell, because most teachers treat these topics the same way: they give you some definitions, make you do a few calculations, then promptly ignore them for the rest of the year. If I don't need to use these ideas again, then they aren't important, right?

Of course, nothing could be more wrong. Vectors and matrices are incredibly useful in science, economics, engineering, and tons of other real-world subjects. Plus, these ideas are elegant, interesting, and...well...cool!

In this class, we'll go over what makes vectors work, see how vectors and matrices are related, and see how the two can be used in such awesome endeavors as building an airplane, making a video game, and even imagining space with more than three dimensions.


Prerequisites
We will be using a lot of concepts from Algebra I and geometry; if you have seen the quadratic formula ("minus b, plus or minus the square root of..." blah blah blah) and you know what "sine" and "cosine" mean, then you should be able to understand what's going on. The students who will probably get the most out of this class are those currently learning trigonometry or pre-calculus.

M1723: Learn to Program Interactive Art
Difficulty: **

Learn the basics of programming using JavaScript and interactive art.

You'll make little sketches that you can publish online and share.

We'll use the sketchpad.cc environment; lots of examples of what you can do on that site! Visit http://goo.gl/Mq7M4


Prerequisites
Previous attempts at programming may be helpful!

M1742: How to Defend Yourself Against Probability
Difficulty: **

Have you ever heard a statistic that sounded unbelievable? We'll teach you how to interpret these numbers in a meaningful way. We will discuss several fundamental concepts of probability (which you already use without even thinking about it!) in an approachable, quantitative way. We'll then use these tools to show you how to ask the important questions that will you from being tricked by statistics.


Prerequisites
Only the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide!

M1808: An Introduction to Mathematical Logic
Difficulty: ***

This course will introduce students to the field of mathematical logic. Because history is cool, the first part of the course will be an historical overview of how the field came to be. The second part of the course will be an introduction to the methods, notation, and concepts of mathematical logic. In the third part of the course, we will examine several major theorems from across the field to give a glimpse into the breadth, complexity, and beauty of modern mathematical logic.


Prerequisites
Mathematical logic is necessarily abstract, so a willingness or desire to think in that manner is required. A solid grounding in advanced algebra and some exposure to proofs (like in geometry) is strongly recommended.

M1840: The Math of Poker
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Chris Guthrie

Poker isn't about getting good cards, isn't about having the cojones to bluff like a maniac, and usually isn't about miraculous mind-reading. It's all about math - combinations and probabilities and algebra. The class will introduce some basic No Limit Hold 'Em theory and the math poker pros use all the time to make their decisions. Practical scenarios.


Prerequisites
Algebra 2

M1666: Speed is good (and so are ergonimcs)
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Tyler Adams

It's 2011 and everybody uses a computer for at least a few hours every day. Some of you use it for more than a few. Why not make your experience as comfortable, natural, and fast as possible. In this lecture we're going to go over some general rules when designing your work space to be as comfortable as possible. We will also show you a few cool tools which may make your computer experience more comfortable.

The material of this course will have a little something for everybody. We will promote everything from basic ideas to advanced unix pipelines.

M1810: Fun With Pi
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Debashis Sahoo

Wanna know the secret history behind $$\pi$$? You will also see how $$\pi$$ can change your personal life. Come to the class to learn more fun facts about $$\pi$$.

M1818: Grid-based Logic Puzzles
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eleanor Lin

In this class, we will introduce a set of three Grid-based Logic (Nikoli) Puzzles: Slitherlink (Fences), Light Up, and Nurikabe. We will cover the rules of each puzzle, and then introduce some solving techniques. If you like Sudoku, you'll probably like these puzzles too.

M1908: Al Gore-isms
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jacob Hurwitz

Ever wondered how Google Maps finds a route so quickly, or how the Watson computer is smart enough to play Jeopardy? Well, we won't answer those questions but we will learn about algorithms, and we'll probably end up "creating" an algorithm along the way.


Prerequisites
You should have a solid grasp of mathematics.

M1628: The Internet and Computer Networks
Difficulty: **

Got some 1337 skills but at a loss when it comes to networks? Come learn about how the Internet and computer networks work!

I'll teach you how to use and abuse the internet's underlying network protocols TCP and IP, and application protocols like HTTP, SMTP, and POP. You'll also learn about some of the fundamental physical limitations that restrict connection speed.

Cool demos included!


Prerequisites
No prior knowledge required! You don't need to have 1337 skills.

M1663: Video game design for fun and profit! Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Yifeng Huang

Explore in detail what "fun" actually means by learning to make video games. We won't emphasize the programming aspect of video game creation, but rather explore the "fuzzy" design side: what does it mean for a game to be fun? How can I design a fun game? Why are some games popular and others not?


Prerequisites
Interest in video games, basic experience with computers (no programming experience required!).

M1751: Computer Science and Social Change
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sam King

There is a myth that if you're interested in helping people or social change, you should get good at political science or be a doctor. Those are both perfectly good routes for social change, but people interested in computer science can make the world a better place also! In this course, the founder of Code the Change will be talking about different opportunities to use computer science skills for social change.

This course will not assume a technical background, so if you don't have any computer science experience, you can still learn in this course.


Prerequisites
There are no prerequisites for this course aside from an interest in making the world a better place!

M1785: Ring Theory
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

Addition and multiplication seem like such basic ideas. You can add numbers, and you can multiply numbers, and that’s all there is. But what if you could add or multiply things that *aren't* numbers? This fundamental mathematical generalization opens up a new world of much richer ideas, and uncovers the truth about algebra.

We’re going to study ring theory, one branch of algebra that investigates what happens with a set in which you can add and multiply. We’ll focus on polynomial rings while developing ring theory in general. This class is going to be extremely fast and abstract, so be prepared for quite a ride if you come!


Prerequisites
All of high school algebra, and ideally, know how to do polynomial division

M1853: INTRO TO CALCULUS!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jonathan Gelbart

Does the word "calculus" scare or intimidate you? Fear no longer! Take this quick course and learn about one of the most important elements of calculus: the derivative. At the end, you'll be able to solve problems like this:

$$\frac{d}{dx}\left(ax^{2}+bx+c\right)=?$$

How cool is that?


Prerequisites
Algebra 1 (quadratic equations, slope). Basic physics would help to understand the examples, but it is not required.

M1870: Discrete Calculus
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: First Last

Discrete calculus is the discrete analogy of normal calculus. It is the reframing of the ideas of calculus in the context of discrete sequences and series.

In this course, we'll learn discrete derivatives, integrals, and the theorems connecting them. We'll see how discrete calculus can be used to find closed-forms for sequences, such as sum of squares or cubes, and how it connects to Pascal's triangle.

It will be helpful if you already know calculus, but this class could also serve as an introduction to the concepts of calculus.

M1673: Undecidability
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Joe Zimmerman

There are some problems that no computer program can solve. Not just problems like “compose a great symphony” or “print the meaning of life” -- specific, well-defined, and surprisingly natural computational problems for which we can prove mathematically that no program can solve them. In this course, we will see some of these problems; along the way, we will also discover precisely what we mean by “program”, and we will explore some wacky and probably counter-intuitive facts about infinity.


Prerequisites
Some notion of what computer programs look like and what it's like to write one.

M1689: Number Theory and its Applications to Modern Cryptography
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Wendy Mu, Frank Wang

In this class, we will start by discussing some number theory that motivated the creation of RSA and modern cryptography. For the second half of the class, we will provide modern cryptography techniques, such as symmetric and public/private key encryption schemes (RSA, elliptic curves). We will also discuss mistakes commonly made in cryptography as well as attacks on RSA and elliptic curve systems. If there is time leftover or if there is significant interest, we will also discuss recent and current research being done in cryptography.


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of algebra and pre-calculus would be helpful.

M1920: Fun brain teasers and puzzles
Difficulty: **

Let's challenge your brain with fun brain teasers and puzzles! This class will be an interactive class with teachers. We will divide the class by small groups and each teacher will ask you questions and help you go through them.

M1606: Intro to web design HTML/CSS - a splash original
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Alvin Sng

This is the good ol intro to web design class that I have been teaching at splash for years now. Many of the previous students that have taken this course love it! Hopefully you will too! This is an easy and FUN class that will teach you all you need to know to get a website rolling! No experience in web design is needed! Laptops are optional.


Prerequisites
none

M1917: Math made easy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Venkat Danda

Some people think Math as hard, but Math is fun. In this course I will show how Math is easy and exciting. You will learn Concepts of Algebra, problem solving etc.



Prerequisites
Introduced to Algebra.

M1598: Learn Programming by Making Games in Python
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Al Sweigart

An introduction to computer programming by making simple games. This class will introduce students to the Python programming language.


Prerequisites
None. This course is aimed at people who have never programmed before.

M1607: Creating dynamic websites with jQuery/Javascript Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alvin Sng

Do you ever wonder why websites are so much better than what they were 5 years ago? Well, chances are they use javascript! (or flash, but lets ignore that :). In this class you will learn to write javascript code with the help of jQuery, the most popular javascript library. It is recommended that you knowledge of html and css before hand. You can also take my intro to web design class if you are new to web design.


Prerequisites
knowledge of html and css

M1610: Cryptography and Secret Writing for Beginners
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Al Sweigart

This is an introduction to the art of writing secret codes. This class will go over how to encrypt and decrypt writing, what makes a cipher strong or weak, and how to break ciphers.

Some of the ciphers covered: Caesar, Transpositional, Simple Substitution, and Vigenere.

No computer experience is required for this class.


Prerequisites
None

M1636: Practical Computer Science
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Meghbartma Gautam

This is a course that teaches practical computer science

1. E-Mail
2. Search
3. Wikipedia
4. Entertainment


Prerequisites
Interest

M1891: Introduction to Linux Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Schuyler Smith

Always wondered what this whole open-source thing is all about? Heard of Linux but never tried it? Never heard of Linux? This class is for you! In less than two hours we'll fly through the basics of Linux, why it matters, and how you can try it or get involved. Then, because that's not enough, we'll jump into a quick technical overview of how Linux/GNU actually works, several common programs/use cases, and an introduction to the terminal. Also, there will be penguins.


Prerequisites
Proficiency with a mouse and an open mind.


Physical Science

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P1780: History of Radio, Part 1
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Drew Compston

While we all have come to take for granted the instant access to information made easily available through TV, the internet, and cell phones, this was only made possible after the development of the radio. Yet despite the way radio revolutionized the way people communicated with each other and is still an integral part of our lives even now, few people are familiar with the story behind this amazing invention.

This is part 1 of a 2-part course aiming to rectify that. This part traces the scientific discoveries in electricity and magnetism that made the invention of radio possible. Unlike most science courses, though, I want to show you how the early scientists made their discoveries, not just dryly present their findings. In doing so, I hope to give you a taste for what it is like to DO science. Along the way, we will meet the human and at times peculiar and eccentric characters who played some role in developing this innovative technology.

The next course tells the story of the engineers who used the earlier scientists’ discoveries to fundamentally change people’s lives by inventing radio, giving context to why the study of science is important.


Prerequisites
This is part 1 of a 2-part course, but each course is independent enough that it is possible to only take one or the other if you prefer. However, you will definitely appreciate the subject more if you enroll in both.

P1654: Interplanetary Space Missions: A Tour of the Solar System
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Cyrus Foster

We’ll talk about past, present and upcoming space missions to celestial bodies beyond Earth. Starting with our Moon, we’ll do a tour of the solar system covering all the planets, even former ones.

Photographs and science data returned from interplanetary space probes will be presented and discussed, as well as the engineering behind how these distant robotic explorers are made.

Did you know Mars once had rivers, lakes and oceans (and possibly still has microbial life)? Did you know that Jupiter has a Moon with more liquid water than Earth (and nobody knows what could be swimming down there… yet)?

P1746: The Physics of Inception
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Gabriel Ehrlich

Christopher Nolan's mind-bending 2010 film Inception plays with the idea of dreams made real, and dreams within dreams. The film suggests some ways to adapt physics to the dream world, but do they work? In this class, we question the implications of slowed time, among other ideas in the movie, and we may find answers weirder than the movie itself.


Prerequisites
If you haven't already watched Inception, please watch it before coming to class. Knowledge of physics is welcomed but quite unnecessary.

P1829: Newtonian Mechanics and Electromagnetism (1 of 5 in Lectures in Physics)
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jonathan Maltz

The Physics of the everyday world. How the Earth goes around the Sun, how planes fly, why a pebble and a boulder will hit the ground at the same time.

See how the same equations that govern how the electical circuits in your house work describe the electromagnetic magnetic fields of galaxies, as well as the light coming from both of them.

From projectiles to Heavy Machinery, from light bulbs to particle accelerators. See how this basic starting point of modern Physics influences many aspects of the world. The subject isn’t as Classical as it’s name implies.

P1871: The Lab-Manual of Sherlock Holmes
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Victoria Chang

Sherlock Holmes was a man of many talents. Aside from being a consummate detective, he was also a skilled chemist. In A Study in Scarlet, Dr. Watson calls his knowledge of chemistry “profound”, and in 2002, the Royal Society of Chemistry awarded him an honorary fellowship.

Students will learn about some of the important discoveries made by chemists of the Holmes era (late 1800’s to early 1900’s), as well as some important basic chemical concepts.

This class contains lecture, demonstration, and hands on components, including some experiments that Holmes himself might have performed.






Prerequisites
Some basic chemistry would be helpful, but is not required.

P1603: Physics of MRI
Difficulty: ***

The advent of quantum mechanics made it possible to formally treat the internal degrees of freedom of atoms and molecules. While it was well known from chemistry that such objects had discrete spectral lines, there was no mathematical formalism to address the interaction of matter with light, one of the most ubiquitous physical phenomena. In this class we consider a workhorse example of quantum physics: the two level system. We explore the mathematics that describe NMR and MRI, and how that formalism can describe a host of other observed phenomena.

P1611: Physics in sports
Difficulty: **
Teachers: jonggyoon han

Many students think physics is too difficult. I hope this is the first step to become familiar with physics. I`m going to introduce you some physics concept that is used in sports.


Prerequisites
Just bring your interest

P1873: The Paradox of Existence
Difficulty: *
Teachers: First Last

Why does the universe exist? Why does anything exist at all (as opposed to nothingness)? How do the processes of the brain give rise to consciousness? Will we one day be able to replicate consciousness inside a computer?

In this course, we'll discuss some theories of existence and consciousness. Everything will be highly speculative, so bring plenty of salt.

P1716: Fun with Chemistry

Using dry ice, liquid nitrogen, silly putty and more, we will explore the nature of phase transformations of matter. If time, we’ll also look at another type of matter transformation - chemical reactions - that might explosive, colorful, surprising, or all of the above!


Prerequisites
Nothing!

P1652: Muon in a Jar
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Spencer Gessner

In this class we will build particle detectors. Really? Really. They will detect cosmic rays from space using stuff you can mostly find around the house. If you had done this sixty years ago you would have won like 5 Nobel Prizes.


Prerequisites
None!

P1655: Space Exploration: Asteroids and Comets
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Cyrus Foster

We’ll take a look at what exactly are asteroids and comets, where they come from and what they are made of. More importantly, what happens if one of these asteroids hits the Earth? How often is that likely to happen?

We’ll also discuss the robotic spacecraft that have visited asteroids and comets and present the imagery and data returned from these robotic ambassadors. Finally, we’ll take a look at what a human mission to some of these asteroids might look like and when it is likely to happen.

P1671: Introductory Concepts in Biophysics
Difficulty: ***

Serves to introduce advanced high school students to cutting-edge research in the field of biophysics and how to perform calculations needed to study biology from a physical standpoint.

Some topics that will be covered:
Protein composition and structure and the role of protein structure to function
Enzymes: basic concepts and kinetics
Effect of force on chemical reaction kinetics
Polymer dynamics and its role in biological function

Will refer to recent publications from the field.




Prerequisites
General Chemistry Basic Biochemistry Basic Physics

P1882: Solar Astronomy: The Science of Staring at the Sun
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Fedja Kadribasic

This is a class where you get to learn about, talk about, and even look at the closest star to us - our very own Sun. We will spend the first half of the class discussing what makes the Sun shine and what causes some of its amazing properties. We will also look at some images from NASA that show the Sun in the parts of the spectrum that we cannot even see. In the second half, we will look at the Sun using special telescopes and filters to explore what we can see, and we will relate it to what we learned earlier in class. Hopefully, by the end of this class you will understand and witness the many strange and wonderful phenomena that comprise our Sun.


Prerequisites
Some basic astronomy and physics knowledge is helpful, but not required.

P1741: Looking for Extraterrestrial Intelligence
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Greg P

What are the odds that humanity will ever find an intelligent alien? Where would you even start looking? Whether or not you think there's other life out there, there's plenty to learn by trying to answer these questions. This class will give a fast-paced overview of a broad array of disciplines--from astronomy to biology and even philosophy--as they relate to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence.

P1792: Supernovae and the Expanding Universe
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michael Shaw

"When I had satisfied myself that no star of that kind had ever shone before, I was led into such perplexity by the unbelievability of the thing that I began to doubt the faith of my own eyes. " -- T. Brahe.

Supernovas are among the most spectacular shows in the heavens. And earlier this month, observations of distant supernovae won the Nobel Prize in Physics for their role as a probe of the expanding universe. These massive explosions help keep the heavens in line, and provide our best constraints on supposedly faster than light neutrinos.

Bring your questions and join us for an explosive discourse on what supernovae are, how they explode, and what we can learn from them.

P1825: Physics of Sound and Vibration
Difficulty: **

An introduction to the mathematics and modelling of sound and vibration. Topics include: How sound waves are created, travel through the air, and are detected by the human ear. The role of overtones in sound waves and the reason different musical instruments sound different while playing the same note.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with the graphs of sine and cosine suggested.

P1830: Special and General relativity - (2 of 5 in lectures in physics)
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jonathan Maltz

You have heard of
$$E = mc^2$$ but what about
$$G_{\mu.\nu} = \frac{8\pi G}{c^4}T_{\mu,\nu} $$?

Learn how fast is fast, and how the speed of light made us change our notions of Classical physics, space time and the very nature of the universe.

P1597: Michaelson Morley Experiment and Introduction to Special Relativity
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Dima Kamalov

We'll talk about a famous physics experiment that demonstrated a property of light and motivated the theory of special relativity


Prerequisites
Working with graphs and geometry at the precalculus level. High school physics class useful but not necessary.

P1752: Particle Physics Primer - What is the Higgs Boson anyway?
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Kiel Howe

It's an exciting time for particle physics! Particle collider experiments are about to unravel mysteries that have teased us for forty years, so now is the perfect time for you to learn a thing or two!

Although the field has a reputation for complexity, much of particle physics can be described in beautifully simple and intuitive ways (ever heard of a Feynman diagram? What about billiards?). The overall goal of the course is to use this picture to explain to you why we spent 9 billion dollars looking for something called the "Higgs Boson." On the way, we'll answer some other important questions like:
+ What is a (fundamental) particle?
+ What kinds of particles are there?
+ Why is the universe filled with particles?
+ How do we 'see' particles?




Prerequisites
I will use concepts from trigonometry and introductory physics (kinematics), but very few equations. It will be helpful if you've taken these classes, but not necessary.

P1788: On Black Holes, Singularities, and the Event Horizon: A Journey into the Abyss
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Michael Shaw

Back by popular demand! We’re going to dive right into the most massive objects in our universe—billions of times the mass of the sun. (Note: we won’t actually dive into a black hole—it’s hard to get out).

When small stars die, they peter out. When massive stars die, they explode in supernovas, outshining an entire galaxy, and what’s left is a black hole, a singularity of mass so dense that even light is trapped behind. We’ll tour around a few black holes, study their effect on our daily lives, and of course, the seven ways a black hole can kill you. I’ll venture into wormholes, white holes, and other exotics. We’ll even bring in a sporting interest and talk about how Stephen Hawking once lost a bet on black holes, and how it was related to the ultimate demise and even death of these most mysterious of objects. (Food for thought: how does a black hole die, anyway?)

Be ready to open your minds, to be bent by the curvature of spacetime, and generally to lose yourself in the fun and beauty of the most amazing objects out there in the sky.


P1831: Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics (3 of 5 in lectures in physics)
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jonathan Maltz

Welcome to the funhouse.

If you thought relativity was weird, just wait.

Dive into the weird world of quantum mechanics were particles can go through walls, become entangled with particles on the other side of the universe, and can be simultaneously in two completely different states all at the same time.

While we are at it, see how statistics and large numbers of degrees in freedom in classical physics emerge into an new theory of probablities which describes systems as complex as atmospheres and biological tissues described though simple parameters such as heat and pressure.

P1809: Introduction to Interstellar Warfare
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Daniel Kane

Full title: "Defense of a gravity well against a first-strike counter-value attack by a known-physics adversary with a sub stellar mass economy, or dodging rocks". Class will cover possible techniques for interstellar war using known physics. Topics include lasers, kinetic bombardment, armor, nanites, black holes and more.

P1687: Quantum Mechanics without Mathematics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yao-Yuan Mao

This class is formerly known as "Quantum Mechanics: Another Aspect."

I'd like to introduce some very interesting (and probably odd) ideas about Quantum Mechanics. Those ideas are very different from your "common sense." Without introducing the mathematical framework, I want to discuss with you how you understand and interpret the Nature's law. In the end it may change (part of) your view to the world.


P1833: Quantum Field Theory, Particle Physics, Cosmology, and all that.(4 of 5 in lectures in physics)
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jonathan Maltz

The current state of modern physics; how we think the universe works. Find out how the rules of quantum mechanics and special relativity gives way to a formalism and theory that is the most accurate theory in all of science. A model that describes in principle all of Chemistry, Nuclear physics, and almost every interaction of the world that doesn’t involve Gravity. See how the rules of physics on the largest scales (General Relativity) describe the formations of galxies and Superclusters and even decribes the history and beginning of the universe itself in the big bang. Find out how the universe is not only expanding but speeding up, and why 96% of the universe is made out of matter and energy that we have no idea what it is, the so called dark matter and dark energy.

P1623: Invention & innovation using Toys which are Patented
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Howard Peters

Processes of invention and innovation are discused and emphasized using toys which were/are patented... including the FRISBEE, YO-YO. SLINKY , etc. You don't need to be a rocket scientist to be an inventor. Find a problem ...and solve it..
The class will end with a free drawing for the above toys with a copy of their US patent.


Prerequisites
none

P1876: How to Talk to Aliens Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: P B

Lots of us have spent hours reading or watching science fiction in which humans communicate with extraterrestrials of one kind or another, but few of us have given much thought to how we ourselves would practically do this if given the chance, not to mention what we'd actually want to say. In this interactive course, we'll:
* look at some examples of how communication with aliens is depicted in popular culture
* brainstorm together about what we might want to tell an alien race about ourselves and what technologies/scientific principles we'd use to convey that information
* learn in detail about one answer that one group of humans came up with, the Voyager Golden Record
* discuss how we might approach the Voyager project if it were happening in the present day, nearly 25 years after the original


Prerequisites
Some basic knowledge of the following topics might be helpful, but I promise it's not necessary :-) * astronomy * basic biology/chemistry/physics * electronic audio/video technologies * anthropology

P1658: Physics of the Large Hadron Collider
Difficulty: *

The Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland has just turned on, and promises to revolutionize humanity’s understanding of the universe. Maybe you’ve heard about the Higgs Boson, Dark Matter, Supersymmetry, and more— what are all of these concepts, and how will we be able to see them at the machine? We will start with the basics of colliders and detectors, discuss the particles that may one be discovered, and even look at real data from the ATLAS experiment. If you’ve been keeping up with the latest news or if you’ve never heard of the LHC before, you’ll come out of this class understanding what scientists are looking for and how they do it at the world’s largest experiment.


Prerequisites
Some high school physics (kinematics, E&M) and math (algebra) would be helpful.

P1756: Introduction to Fluid Mechanics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Robert Moffatt

In this class, I will describe the principles behind many familiar fluid phenomena. Topics include: airplane wings, helicopters, drag, parachutes, terminal velocity, tornados, vortex rings, propellers, wind turbines, boundary layers, flow separation, golf balls, and cavitation.


Prerequisites
Some familiarity with algebra would be helpful.

P1762: Climate Change - Facts and Fictions Full!

The earth is getting warmer. Tropical Glaciers are melting. Species are migrating. The oceans are getting more acidic. But why isn't anyone doing anything about it? What should we do about it?

We'll use fun demonstrations and examples to explain the facts behind global warming, debate the controversy and discuss what our next steps as a global society should be.


Prerequisites
Basic Earth and Physical Sciences

P1834: Advanced Topics - Supergravity, String theory and the future - (5 of 5 in lectures in physics
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jonathan Maltz

The cutting edge of physics. The rules of Q.F.T. describe the very small and the rules of G.R. describe the very large; when the two are put together however they are inconsistent. It isn’t just that they disagree they don’t even speak the same language yet they are supposed to describe the same universe. Find out what all this talk of Strings is about. Why we are looking for this strange symmetry between between bosons and fermions, why a 27 km circumference Hadron collider has been built in europe looking for a particle named after a guy called Higgs. Why Emergent phenomemon, Computational physics, Condensed matter and String theory might be the physics of the next century and why the beginning of the universe might have more to do with a bubble forming in boiling water then you think.

P1884: Magnetism: beyond the fridge door
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Hilary Noad

Ever wondered how your fridge magnets got their magnetism? Ever wanted to build your own electromagnet? Did you know that some materials can enter exotic states known as spin glasses, spin ices, and spin liquids? In this course we will explore the strange and wonderful world of magnetism, from classical physics to quantum, touching upon a collection of my favourite topics. For those of you who like to learn by doing, the class will include several hands-on activities.

P1670: Green Lantern? Green Flames. Electronic Transitions and Radiation

In this class, we will learn why different metal salts burn different colors. For instance, potassium chloride burns purple while cupric sulfate burns green.
The demonstration will be used as motivation to explain the chemical principles behind electronic transition of various metals, and to provide a brief summary of the electromagnetic spectrum, fluorescence, electronic states in a lattice, and atomic orbital theory.


Prerequisites
Basic general chemistry preferred but not required

P1706: Handmade Air Cannons and Physics of Smoke Rings Full!
Difficulty: **

Have you ever seen people making smoke rings and wondered how that is possible? Have you ever wanted an air cannon to freak friends out on Halloween? Come to this class to learn about smoke rings and to make your own air cannons. "Fluid dynamics" sounds difficult but not this class. You won't be ask to solve any complicated equation, but instead, you will learn many useful concepts in fluid dynamics while enjoying the handmade air cannon fun!


P1744: Nuclear Fusion Energy
Difficulty: **

In this class we will explore the field of nuclear fusion energy in the context of renewable energies. Nuclear fusion is the energy source that powers our sun, and it has the potential to provide clean, sustainable, affordable and abundant energy for the masses here on earth. Unfortunately, attempts to recreate this powerful process terrestrially have so far been unsuccessful. In this class we will investigate the science and technology behind nuclear fusion power. We will explain why nuclear fusion power has been "30 years away" for the past 50 years and also look into some new developments that may be bringing us much closer to the goal of commercial fusion power.


Prerequisites
Interest in the subject. None of these is essential, but basic knowledge of atomic structure and electromagnetism will be helpful.

P1835: Pendulums and oscillations
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Trevor Petach

Oscillations are all around us. Sound is created by vibrating air molecules. Light is created by changing electric and magnetic fields. The seasons, earthquakes, and traffic all involve oscillations.

Pendulums are an excellent tool to explore oscillations. We will start by analyzing a regular pendulum. Then, we will investigate two surprising pendulums -- the inverted pendulum and the Foucault pendulum. Along the way, I will introduce the concept of a potential, and you will learn strategies that can be applied to many problems in physics.

There will be demonstrations and a short video or two.


Prerequisites
Algebra II

P1869: The Geometry of Space-time
Difficulty: **
Teachers: First Last

A century ago, Einstein realized that the behavior of light could be used to understand the geometry of space-time. In this course, we'll revisit that discovery, with an emphasis on understanding Minkowski space through graphics and simulation.


P1888: Planets around Other Stars
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Lauren Weiss

This course will introduce students to the techniques that scientists have used to discover planets around other stars. Students will work in teams to try their hand at these techniques with real data. We will discuss the nature of planets around other stars (including the recent discoveries of a six-planet system and a planet with two stars) and the possibility for life on these worlds.


Prerequisites
Students must be comfortable with algebra. Familiarity with mechanical physics, especially Kepler's laws of orbital motion and Newtonian gravitation, would be useful but is not required.

P1627: Introduction to the Dark Side of the Universe
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Masha Baryakhtar

Physics and astronomy have been very successful and accurate at describing the universe we live in. It turns out that only 4% of the universe is made up of the stuff you and I are made of, atoms we know and love - and understand. In this class we will explore what we know and don’t know about the other 96%, focusing on the part called “dark matter” - how we know its there, what we think its made of, and how we’re trying to learn more about it.



Prerequisites
High school level algebra. Some physics will be helpful but not necessary.

P1594: Megathrust earthquakes
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Noel Bartlow

Megathrust earthquakes are the biggest quakes in the world. Come learn about how and where they happen. We'll learn some general stuff about earthquakes, then study the Japan 2011 and Chile 2010 megathrust earthquakes more closely. We'll also learn about tsunamis and why earthquakes cause them. This class will include first hand video of earthquake and tsunami damage.

P1738: Hacking Halloween
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Roger Chen, Nik Evitt

Want to see pumpkins shoot flames? How about leak smoke? Turn blood into water? We can't walk on water but we can do a bunch of awesome stuff that is clearly not based on any chemistry at all, because it's just magic. Remember that.

P1868: The Most Remarkable Things We Know
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Tevin Tatro

Come learn about some of the most remarkable things humans have come to figure out. They range from the origin of the cosmos to how we think about the world. We will go through a sweeping (albeit brief) history of the universe as well as explore our inner psychology.


Social Science

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S1650: An Introduction to Hinduism
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Somik Raha

This class presents an introduction to Hinduism from a practitioner’s perspective. Students will hear stories that exemplify different traditions within Hinduism and learn about the differences and similarities between these traditions.

S1755: Thinking like an Economist Full!
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Yu Dilys Sun

Ever heard of the book Freaknomics? This popular book teaches people how to think like an economist, thinking about business and every day issues with a twist, and understand it from a brand new angle. In this class, we look at Apple commercials, read Wall Street Journal and Mashable front pages and analyze the news and discussions around current events. Of course, we use calculations and case studies as well. Math is an economist's friend so be prepared to do some exercises early in the morning

S1760: Introduction to Symbolic Logic, Part I
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jillynne Quinn

We will go over the definition of a logical argument, what logic is good for, the operators used in symbolic logic and, how to symbolize statements. The class will be a combination of lecture and group activities.

S1787: What Is Intelligence?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Daniel Zaharopol

"If the Aborigine drafted an I.Q. test, all of Western civilization would presumably flunk it," wrote anthropologist Stanley Garn.

What is intelligence, really? Can we measure it? If so, what does it tell us about the human mind? Is it something that's born into us by our genes, or does it depend on how we're raised? What makes someone smart?

Not all of these questions have been answered, but there's some pretty good progress towards understanding them. Come discover just what it means (or doesn't mean) to be "smart".

S1796: While Europe Slept--Science in the Middle Ages
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ranjana Mehra

Following the collapse of the western Roman empire, as Europe descended into the dark ages, the torch of wisdom was kept alive in the houses of wisdom in Baghdad, Cairo, Cordoba, and Uzbekistan where Egyptian, Greek, Indian, and Persian knowledge was translated into Arabic. The manuscripts brought by these scholars were deemed worth their weight in gold at these incubators of science, where ancient ideas were studied, improved and extended. This knowledge was then consolidated in books that were translated back into Latin as Europe awoke to Renaissance. Behind all this cross-cultural meeting and testing of ideas was the generous patronage of Al Mamun (786-833), the Caliph of Baghdad. But sources and names get lost in translation and not many people now know or give credit to these scientists who deserve a place of their own in the annals of history. They should be known as well if not better than Leonardo da Vinci, Wright Brothers, William Harvey who drew their inspiration from these medieval scientists. We’ll look at the remarkable achievements of Al Haitham, Al Jazari, Banu Musa brothers, Al Khawarizmi, Abbas Bin Firnas, Ibn Rushd, Ibn Sina, Al Idrisi, Piri Reis, Ibn Majid among others. We’ll also accompany the intrepid traveler Ibn Battuta as he journeys from Tangiers, Morocco to go beyond India and back in his epic journey, in 1325. Come with me, as I look back at this golden age of science.

S1696: Given Life Forever: Ancient Egyptian Art and Hieroglyphics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Dustin Fink

The Egyptians constructed some of the most incredible edifices, created the most luxurious art, and wrote in the most beautiful writing. Come learn basic hieroglyphics, the basics of how to decipher Egyptian wall art, and a bit of the history and mythology behind it. Time permitting, there will be a trip to the Cantor Art Center to view Stanford's collection.

S1902: Pay it forward - why volunteering and community service is important.
Difficulty: *

Have you ever wondered why people volunteer and do community work? Have you also wondered how to get started and whats the best way to get involved? This course will introduce you to the basics of volunteering. We will see the logic and the need for us to get involved with the community and also the mechanics of where, when and how.


Prerequisites
Just bring a open mind?

S1791: In Search of Hittites
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ranjana Mehra

Imagine, if you will, a bunch of archaeologists snooping around a field near Tell el Amarna on the east bank of the Nile on a fine morning in 1887. Imagine also an irate wife of an Egyptian farmer, throwing pieces of baked clay at these snoops, to send them on their way. Now, really stretch your imagination and see these archaeologists straining to catch these flying clay pieces, seeing all too clearly the cuneiform writing on them and almost fainting in their amazement as they realize what they have in their hands, then beseeching the woman for more of these baked clay pieces. But this is the stuff of legend. Not far from truth though. The archaeologists began looking for more and stumbled upon the most important clay-tablet archives that have ever been found, the records of king Amenophis IV. These Amarna tablets were easily readable, written in Akkadian, the ancient language for international negotiations in the Ancient East. They spoke of raids by bands of Hittite warriors across the far northern frontier of Egypt into Syria. But there were also actual Hittite letters indicating more amicable relations. The range of subject in these Amarna letters for the first time proved that the Hittites had been a Great Power and they lived in Asia Minor or Anatolia. We will use these to take a look at the mighty Hittites who took on the powerful Egyptian empire. We will discover why the Egyptians under Ramesses II and his Hittite counterpart Hattusilis III signed a peace treaty several decades after Ramesses II supposedly won a battle and celebrated his victory in the battle of Kadesh over the Hittites? We will also examine how the Hittites got to be such mighty warriors, with their state of the art chariots and their superior horsemanship? What did their neighbors, the Mitannis, who invoked Vedic deities in their treaties, have to do with it? We’ll go deep into the happenings in Anatolia and Syria around 1400 B.C.E.

S1647: Cultural Differences in the US: Comparing the South to California
Difficulty: **

Confused about how two regions in the US could be so different? Or do you not even realize the differences? Attend this funny seminar/ discussion to discuss regional differences and influences. Taught by real Southerners that relocated to the Bay area.

S1740: We Are America: Crash Course on American Government
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alex Holtzman

This is a crash course on government and the ways you can shape our American future. We will cover fundamentals, things you might want to know for polite dinner conversation, weird and wacky facts, and most importantly how you can get involved now.


Prerequisites
Just a desire to learn about our government

S1846: How to win an argument
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sanjay Saraf

No matter what field you go into, you need to know how to hold your own in an argument with your friends, family, and co-workers. How do you convince someone that you're right, and more importantly, that they're wrong?

This class is an exercise in oratory and persuasion. We'll argue about fashion, music, politics, science, and whatever else we can think of.

S1856: The Girl Effect Full!
Difficulty: *

Feminism as the idea of gender equality across all intersecting identities is fundamental to the progress of any society. This course aims to empower and strengthen community and schools by creating leaders. Class time will be in the form of a workshop and discussion on contemporary topics relating to women such as women in media and pop culture, violence against women, global solidarity, and how men must be a part of the conversation.

Note: All genders are encouraged to take this course. We strive to make this a safe and open space to all.

S1861: How to get a Date: The Science of Attraction and Flirting Full!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jason Anderson

Have you ever wanted to know how to tell if somebody is interested in you? Do you want to know how you can make others more attracted to you, without changing how you look or act? This class will cover the science of attraction and flirting from a social psychological perspective. Specifically, the class will cover the physical and psychological factors which lead individuals to be attracted to one another, as well as the ways men and women flirt. Parents: class will be kept PG!

S1857: The Girl Effect