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Splash Spring 2016
Course Catalog


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Biological and Medical Science Engineering
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Biological and Medical Science

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B4769: How to Distinguish Medical Knowledge from Hoaxes?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kun-Hsing Yu

There are lots of newspaper articles talking about the "recent advances in health sciences". Some suggest "beer helps to prevent cancer", others assert "beer increased risks of getting cancer". Which one should we believe?
How do doctors decide what to do when coming across contrary scientific evidences? And what doctors don't know about the surgery they perform or the drugs they prescribe?
We will do some hands-on experiments on drawing conclusions in the world of uncertainty, and take a quick survey of current methodologies in medical sciences.


Prerequisites
Have flipped coins, or played any other games involving probability or uncertainty.

B4962: The Secrets of Motility
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Caleb Chan

There are many opportunities to observe how humans walk, how birds and insects fly, and how fish swim. But have you ever wondered how bacteria gets around once they have invaded your body, how white blood cells come to your rescue and attack these bacteria, or how cancer cells spread from one organ to another and ultimately becomes deadly? Welcome to the microscopic realm of cell motility, come to this class to learn about the secrets of how organisms in the microscopic world move around!


Prerequisites
Curiosity in biology!

B4840: Stop the outbreak!
Difficulty: **

You are a scientist from the CDC, sent to a remote location to investigate an outbreak and stop it from creating a pandemic!
Using several lines of biological evidence, you and your team will race to decipher the cause of the disease and create an antidote, before it's too late!


Prerequisites
general biology, genetics

B4917: Practical Neuroscience
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

What is the brain? How does it work? How can I make it stronger? You’ll learn about awesome experiments that show that the brain can be rewired, remolded and strengthened. You’ll meet someone operating with half a brain (literally), people who built physical strength just by thinking about it, and people who rewired their brains and cured mental illnesses with the power of thought. We’ll cover what you need to know about the brain. If you’ve got a brain, you should take this course!

*** A Note From the Splash Presidents: In discussion with our advisors and in agreement with Dr. Carreon, we have decided to cancel the class on suicide. All students previously enrolled in "Suicide: Why people die by it, and what we can do" have been re-enrolled in this class. For more information, you can contact us at stanfordesp@gmail.com.

[Need help? Call 1 (800) 273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 24/7. For that and other concerns, text "START" to 741741 for the Crisis Text Line. For more resources, visit http://www.crisistextline.org/get-help-now/]

B4938: Chaos and Randomness in the Brain
Difficulty: ***

The brain is a tangle of interconnected neurons constantly communicating with one another via electrical and chemical signals. To the interested neuroscientist, some of these signals are easy to predict; for example, cones in the retina respond reliably to the wavelength of light hitting them. Yet in much of the brain, predicting what makes a neuron fire is a tricky task indeed. Why might an animal benefit from having unpredictable neural activity, and how might the brain generate such unpredictability? It turns out the answer involves not just animal behavior, neuronal biophysics and brain circuits, but also the mathematical theories of chaotic dynamics, graphs, and statistical learning. In this class, we will run breathlessly through these topics and more, with an emphasis on the fundamental connections between biology and mathematics that give rise to even the most commonplace of animal behaviors.


Prerequisites
Comfort with high school math, ideally through calculus.

B4992: Introduction to C. elegans
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jude Lee

Caenorhabditis elegans, or C. elegans for short, is a tiny little worm that is barely visible to naked eye. Yet, these tiny creatures left giant footprints in our understanding of how our own bodies work. So what are so amazing about them? In this class, we will explore the history, biology, and other cool facts about these creatures.

B5012: From Bouncing Molecules to Stripes and Spines
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bruno Beltran

Did you know that your body is made up of more than 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 molecules?

From zebra stripes, to patterns on snakes, to the spacing between the bones in your spine, biological systems have to control their organization by positioning individual molecular signals in this sea of molecules.

With so many chemicals floating around, how do organisms control the position of individual molecules? In this class, we will go over various examples of cells use their genes to create the beautiful and intricate patterns that allow life to exist, even when each individual molecule inside you seems to move completely randomly. There will be cool videos.


Prerequisites
Students should have encountered the idea that all matter is made of molecules, and that chemical reactions happen when two molecules collide with each other. Students should also have encountered the idea that genes are read by the cell to make proteins.

B4793: Biology of Toxins
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Genna Smith

Have you ever wondered how toxins can kill you and why different toxins cause different symptoms? In this class, you will learn how various toxins attack pathways and processes within the the human body. By understanding the action of these toxins we will also see how pharmacologists are turning these toxins into medicine.


Prerequisites
a basic knowledge of cell biology would be helpful

B4921: Practical Neuroscience
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

What is the brain? How does it work? How can I make it stronger?

You’ll learn about awesome experiments that show that the brain can be rewired, remolded and strengthened. You’ll meet someone operating with half a brain (literally), people who built physical strength just by thinking about it, and people who rewired their brains and cured mental illnesses with the power of thought. We’ll cover what you need to know about the brain.

If you’ve got a brain, you should take this course! :)

B5017: Octopi
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Zachary Nunn

This class is for anyone curious about marine life, but will nonetheless focus solely on the amazing species of octopi and their abilities. I claim that if octopuses were social creatures, they would dominate the sea, and I will explain why during the class. My favorite animal is an octopus; I want to convey my passion.


Prerequisites
none

B4870: A CRISPR Breakdown
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cindy Nguyen

Editing the human DNA is becoming easier than ever thanks to the semi-new, but extremely popular CRISPR system. Not sure what it is? Take this class and get a molecular breakdown of a tool that is changing the face of biology as we speak!


Prerequisites
Understand biology basics (primarily what are protein, RNA, and DNA)

B4932: Regenerating the Human Eye with 3D Tissue Engineering: Can Stem Cells Treat Ciliopathies?
Difficulty: **

Did you know that stem cells can be used to generate 3D human optic cups? Learn about 3D tissue engineering approaches that may revolutionize the field of ophthalmology! We will focus on ciliopathies, rare diseases that affect the photoreceptor, the main light sensing cell of the eye. Join us to learn how tissue engineering approaches are providing insight into the molecular mechanisms of these diseases.


Prerequisites
Some background in biology would be helpful, though all students are welcome!

B4860: Life from the Lifeless
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Giovanni Forcina

When we learn about biological chemistry, we tend to focus on the most abundant elements-- namely carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen amongst others. What often gets lost in this discussion is the 1% of trace elements, made up mostly of inorganic, lifeless metals. This course will provide a broad overview of the essential role of metals in biology, a field commonly known as bioinorganic chemistry.


Prerequisites
Some basic biology and chemistry is useful, but not required.

B4885: Evolutionary Game Theory
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rohan Mehta

An activity-based introduction to the application of game theory to evolution. Among other topics, we will explore the evolution of cooperation and discuss why, for instance, peacock's tails are so unwieldy.

B4933: Epidemiology in the Galápagos Islands: Are introduced diseases threatening endemic species?
Difficulty: **

Have you heard of the blue footed booby, the flightless cormorant, or the Galápagos penguin? Join me in learning about these fascinating Galápagos species! We will discuss some of the most pressing threats to the Galápagos Islands, focusing on introduced pathogens and parasites. We will learn about some interesting molecular biology, immunology, and genetics topics! Along the way, I'll share stories and photos from my experience in the Galápagos.

B4757: Advanced Topics in Neuroscience
Difficulty: ***

So you’ve taken an intro neuro/psych class and know the basics of how your brain works. What’s left to learn? A lot, actually. Heard that information flows from dendrites to the cell body and down the axon to the postsynaptic cell, and not the other way around? Fetuses would die before birth and marijuana wouldn’t be so popular if that were actually true. Each half of the brain controls the opposite side of the body? Nope. Neurons all have axons and dendrites? Lies.

Join us to learn about what was too hard, too mysterious, or too recently discovered to be included your previous neuro classes! In this discussion-based session, students will learn about advanced topics in neuroscience as they are asked to solve some of the most thought-provoking questions of the field. How can memories last a lifetime when the molecules that constitute them are being recycled on a daily basis? Can you design a viable method of mind control (yes, the technology already exists)? How could you deliberately create a false memory, or manipulate existing ones? And finally, the big question: What is consciousness?


Prerequisites
For advanced high school students with prior exposure to neuroscience, either through coursework, self-studying, or enrichment programs (e.g., other Splash! courses). They should understand the basics of neurons, action potentials, neurotransmitters, sensorimotor systems, and neural development. They should also be comfortable with cell biology, genetics, protein synthesis, evolutionary biology, and viral life cycles.

B4858: The Wonderful World of Bacterial Communities
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Pascale Guiton

Bacteria are everywhere and similar to humans they communicate with each other and reside within “small houses”. Enroll for this course to learn about the exciting features of a bacterial village, their consequences on human health and their role in the environment


Prerequisites
A keen Interest in microbial world!

B4753: A Crash Course in Cancer Biology
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Melissa Ko

What is cancer? What happens in the body when cancer starts and spreads? What causes cancer? How can we treat it? What would it take to cure this disease?

We'll discuss all of these questions through a whirlwind lesson on genetics, cell biology, evolution, medical research, and more! Be ready to participate and bring any questions you have on cancer and scientific research.


Prerequisites
the more biology you know the better, including topics like what is a cell, what are the parts of the cell and what do they do, what is the purpose and function of DNA/RNA/proteins, etc.

B4776: Preparing for the Pre-Med Path
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sharon Chen

In the fall I taught a walk-in activity about my life as a pre-med and tips on how to succeed as a premed. Having gauged the topics students want to hear about last year, I would like to teach a class in the spring providing students with premed-related resources and information.

B4810: 20 Experiments about the Brain and Behavior That You Must Know: Beyond the Brain Bee
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Lucy Li

How can we make good people do bad things? How does our brain "see" lines? What happens when the two sides of our brain fail to cooperate? Most importantly, if I were to time travel back in history, what experiments should I run to win a Nobel Prize and/or a permanent spot in a psychology or neuroscience textbook? Sponsored by the Stanford Brain Bee, this class provides a fast-paced overview of studies and experiments that have revolutionized what we know about the human brain and behavior.

B4843: What is Biophysics?

Biologists study living systems that function through a vast variety of complex mechanisms. Physicists search for fundamental, mathematical laws of nature that drive physical phenomena. Learn how Stanford biophysicists are using physical tools to understand the complexity of life. Topics ranging from the atomic-level description of biological molecules to the surprisingly clever behavior of cells will be discussed. Selected topics in biophysics will be presented by Stanford graduate students.


Prerequisites
Some background in biology, chemistry, and/or physics is helpful, but not required.

B4939: Bioethics: Current Issues in Medicine and Biology
Difficulty: **

Should companies be able to patent DNA? Do human beings have the right to create new synthetic life? Would it be wise to edit a person's genome? Many new advances in biological science have the potential to change the world forever--for good or ill. Come learn about groundbreaking new developments in biotechnology and discuss the ethical implications they have for modern society.


Prerequisites
Must have taken a high school biology course. Must be willing to actively discuss ethical questions in class.

B4764: Bird Senses: Vision
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rebecca Shi

How similar are bird senses to human senses? What adaptations give falcons such acute vision? Is a white cockatoo actually colorless?

In this class, we'll try to understand the world from a bird's point of view, with a focus on bird vision. We'll study the structures of bird sensory organs and explore the experiments that led to our current understanding of bird perception. Come learn about the fascinating world of birds!

(If you're interested in learning more about birds, check out "Bird Senses: Hearing" and "Bird Basics" for more bird classes!)

B4770: From College to Medical School
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yoo Kim

"From College to Medicine" will give provide a brief overview on how to prepare for medical school admissions and get the most out of your college experience. The course is based on my own experiences in the medical school admissions process along with those of others. The course will include lessons on:

-Figuring out whether medicine is right for you.
-How you can get the most out of your university for your pre-med experience.
-How to excel in your prerequisite courses.
-How to mobilize your extracurricular activities to further your goals in medicine.
-Crafting your very own "pre-med story" for medical school admissions.

B4973: Chocolate Food of the Gods
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Howard Peters

A fun look at the history, biology, biochemistry, health benefits and trivia of chocolate.
Some samples and a raffle for free chocolate items.


Prerequisites
none

B4830: Pre-Med Panel

Interested in pursuing a career in medicine? Curious what it takes during undergrad and medical school? Come hear from a panel of speakers about their experiences and tips as pre-med and medical students at Stanford!

B4914: STEM Outreach for Girls: The Neuroscience of Optical Illusions
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Stephanie Niu

How does the brain sees things that are different from reality? What would it be like to experience the world with reversed senses? Come learn about how the brain processes senses and why reality doesn't always directly translate to our minds. We'll explore sensory illusions and learn about how some neurological treatments for diseases can cause people to experience the world in a completely new way.

B4957: Addiction and Neuroscience
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Why do we do what we don't want to? Or not do what we want to?

This class will explore the strange, universal human experience of being out of control of our actions. We'll look at big ways this happens with alcohol or drugs, but we'll also look at "behavioral addictions" like Facebook, nail-biting, pornography, gambling and cutting.

We'll look at the basic science, as well as some of the ways people treat addictions, big and small.

B4975: Patent it & Make a Billion ...or Not!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Howard Peters

A fun examination of the US Patent Office/system with resources, requirements, history, current status, trivia, etc. ..all about obtaining a US patent.

A free drawing at the end for a familiar patented toy and a copy of its US Patent


Prerequisites
none

B4919: Mind and Body: How Your Mind Makes It Real
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Can a sugar-pill cause morphine release? Can hypnosis cure blindness? Can looks kill (literally)? Can getting shot not hurt?

We'll talk about old history and new science developing around "mind-body" medicine, how your mind and brain affect your body in really interesting ways. We'll meet people with paralysis who can regain their movement, and blind people can regain their sight by the power of words. We'll see how the brain can produce pain completely independently of any "physical" cause.

We'll discuss theories of how the brain might be involved in diseases like fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome.

If that's not enough, you'll learn about ritual executions that rely on the victim's expectation, and soldiers in WWII who get shot but don't seem to mind.

In short, we'll explore the strange and perplexing frontier where Mind meets Body.

[For those who took this already, I am adding a number of slides on the science of placebo, too!]

B4961: What Your Body Looks Like On The Inside
Difficulty: **

Students will learn about human anatomy using cadavers and 3-D visual tools. Various anatomical regions will be covered including the head and neck, abdomen, upper limb, lower limb, back, and heart/lung.

Caution: Real human cadavers are used in the teaching of this course.

B4965: Mighty Mites and Hacking Science
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yoni Rubin

Did you know that the Southern Californian mite called Paratarsotomus macropalpis is the fastest running land animal relative to its body length? Neither did I, until I started filming them with a high speed video camera on my professor's driveway! Join your local enthusiast to learn what these Mighty Mites can teach us about biomechanics, physiology and physics. In addition, students will have the opportunity to learn more about the processes of scientific research, peer-reviewed publications, scientific conferences, and public outreach. This class will be especially useful for students interested in pursuing scientific research during college.


Prerequisites
Basic physics, basic biology, and a curiosity for Mighty Mites!

B5008: Welcome to your brain
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jesus Madrid

Ever wonder what makes you who you are? Or why there are wrinkles in the brain? Or if your fish has a brain? A hands-on introduction to the brain and its various functions. And a chance to ask your burning questions about the brain to a bunch of people studying it!

B5015: DNA Repair Mechanisms and Applications to Genetic Engineering
Difficulty: **

Three billion base pairs have to be replicated accurately every time a human cell divides - and a single mistake could mean disaster. This class provides an overview of the incredible cellular mechanisms that pull off the feat of DNA replication a hundred billion times a day, as well as the emerging application of this knowledge to genetic editing using technologies such as CRISPR/Cas.


Prerequisites
Interest in biology and bioengineering!

B4851: STEM Outreach for Girls: Biology Seminar
Difficulty: **

This course is an interactive and hands-on seminar class about viruses. Students will build virus models as they learn about viruses and discuss the different types and how they work.

B4883: The Environment and Your Brain: Epigenetics and Neuroscience
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Fiorella Grandi

This class will focus on epigenetics, the science of how environment influences the genetic code, in the context of neurons and neuroscience. We'll explore how neurons are shaped by chemical changes to DNA, how epigenetics and memory formation may be linked and what role epigenetics plays in neurological and psychological diseases.


Prerequisites
Knowledge of basic biology.

B4783: Can Your DNA Predict Your Future?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Trevor Martin

Is it possible to predict all the diseases you will get the moment you are born? Do our eating habits and lifestyle choices really influence our health much? Find out in this class what modern genetics and medicine have to say about these exciting questions and learn what knowing our DNA sequence really tells us about ourselves.

BONUS: Students will have the option of finding out their phenotype/genotype for a gene involved in tasting bitterness!


Prerequisites
Any sort of introduction to Biology course; should understand basics of DNA.

B4794: Bird Senses: Hearing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Rebecca Shi

How similar are bird senses to human senses? How does an owl localize its prey in complete darkness? Can birds use echolocation? Can a bird's hearing change with the seasons?

In this class, we'll try to understand the world from a bird's point of view, with a focus on bird hearing. We'll study the structures of bird sensory organs and explore the experiments that led to our current understanding of bird perception. Come learn about the fascinating world of birds!

(If you're interested in learning more about birds, check out "Bird Senses: Vision" and "Bird Basics" for more bird classes!)

B4862: Food for Thought: Role-Play in Nature
Difficulty: **

Have you ever wondered how a bumblebee can affect a jaguar? Did you know a fungus can turn an ant into a zombie? In this class we will role-play: everyone will take on the identity of a different species in a natural community of plants and animals to understand how the members interact in complex, dynamic, and often surprising ways. Along the way, you'll learn concepts of community ecology and apply them to the community we create.

B4888: Inception of Medical Practices
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kelly McGill

Ideas we take for granted nowadays had to start somewhere. This class will explore the origin of many medical practices today that we take for granted, like hand washing, vaccination, quarantine etc.
This class will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

B4913: Speaking the language of the brain
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Daitch

How does your brain inform you whether your dinner plate is filled with a juicy steak or a smelly pile of mush? And how does the brain use this information to guide your behavior (i.e. should you eat whatever is on your plate?). In the first part of this class, students will learn about the way neurons in the brain communicate with one another. Then, students will divide into groups, each group representing one part of the brain, and each student acting out a neuron in that brain region. We'll see if students can successfully send a message between brain regions by speaking the "language of the brain"

B4976: Speciation: Classifying the Biological World
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Michael Dubreuil

The concept of species has been used since the early days of biology to classify the natural world around us. However, we are ever coming to realize designating one species from another is not as easy as it first appears.

We will be talking about what makes a species, where our classifications break down, hybrid species, and the human species


Prerequisites
Introduction to Biology

B4752: The Biology of Hollywood
Difficulty: **
Teachers: William Gearty

What would life really be like if you were shrunk down to the size of an ant or even smaller? Did dinosaurs really look and behave as they are portrayed in Jurassic Park? Would King Kong really have been able to stand up, let alone climb the Empire State Building? Could you really be mutated into a superhero over night? These questions and more will be discussed.


Prerequisites
Some interest in biology. Some interest in movies.

B4755: Human Evolution - A Brief History of Us
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nicholas Rodriguez

You've heard of Darwin and the Galapagos, of Cave Men and Neanderthals, but do you know how all of these things tie together? Come and learn all about hominid evolution over the past 4.5 million years, ending with Homo sapiens development and the beginnings of society as we know it today!


Prerequisites
Interest in human history and evolution

B4768: Would you want to know? Exploring genetic testing and Huntington's disease
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Kristen Powers

If you could find out whether you will develop a disease with no known cure, would you want to know?

This course will provide an introduction to the science behind Huntington’s Disease, which is a genetically inherited disease that affects both the mind and the body. After an overview of cool topics like DNA and genetics, we will talk about genetic testing – what that is, and how it applies to parents or children who may have Huntington’s Disease. You will then use this knowledge to debate the ethical concerns that arise when screening for inherited diseases.

Sample debate prompts:
If your parents have Huntington’s Disease, would you get tested? If you were going to have children but did not know if you had the disease, would you get tested? Would you have kids if you tested positive?


Prerequisites
Basic biology knowledge is helpful, but we'll provide a quick intro at the beginning of the course for context!

B4834: Antibiotic Resistance: Should we be afraid?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sabrina Ergun

I’m sure many of you have had to take an antibiotic at some point in your lives, for strep throat, pneumonia, or a sinus infection. But you might not know that antibiotics are all around you, in soap, toothpaste, even in the food you eat. In this class we will cover the basics how antibiotics work and discuss whether or not antibiotic resistance is a real concern for the future.


Prerequisites
An interest in the biology behind the medicines we take!

B4835: Mushroom Mania!

What do cheese, zombie ants and the biggest, oldest living thing have in common? Fungi! Mushrooms are the part of the a fungus that we see, but they're just the tip of the iceberg. Most of the action takes place out of sight.

Come learn about the hidden world of fungi in this interactive course. You will learn about the ecology, evolution, and human uses of fungi, and will get hands-on practice identifying mushrooms on your own!

B5034: Symbiosis: a love story between corals and dinoflagellates
Difficulty: **

Around the world, coral reefs are experiencing severe environmental stress and turning white, a.k.a "bleaching." What's going on during bleaching? What role do dinoflagellates (microscopic algae) play? And how can we test it?

Students will explore the science of symbiosis and current research through hands-on demonstrations and light microscopy with sea anemones.


Prerequisites
none, just be curious and willing to get salty. Please wear closed-toe shoes (i.e. no flip-flops)

B4836: Tiny Ocean Dwellers
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alma Parada

What’s in the water your swimming or surfing in? How many are there? The answers will surprise you! Learn about the tiniest living (and not technically living) creatures that make living on this earth possible. And build a microbe to take home!

B4876: Food Product Development
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Brian Chau

You walk down the aisle of a supermarket and you stumble upon these weirdly flavored chips. Ever wonder how someone's crazy idea is put from concept to product?

Culinary arts + food science = AWESOME PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT. You take science and add it to cooking and bam, that delicious or sometimes bizarre flavored chip comes to a store near you.


Prerequisites

B4887: Biological Breakthroughs
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua Eggold

CRISPR, PCR, SDS-PAGE, FISH, RFLP, IF, CyTOF, MIBI, ATAC-seq, ChIP, ACT, CAR. From this list of biological techniques, you can probably tell that scientists really like acronyms! But what else can these techniques tell us? This class will provide an overview of groundbreaking biological techniques that have been developed within the last few decades, with a focus on why they are so useful. We will also spend time discussing the future potentials of biological research to improve our lives. If you’re interested in biology, scientific research, love to think creatively, or want to learn about some awesome technology, this class is for you!


Prerequisites
Understanding of basic biological principles (cells, DNA, protein)

B4928: Mind, body, food, & you: what we eat and why we eat it
Difficulty: **

Would you like fries with that? Secrets from the food lab reveal that dozens of subtle cues (most of which we are not even aware of!) influence what we eat, when we eat, and how we eat it. This interactive seminar will reveal the most recent research findings about things that unconsciously influence your eating habits as well as what the consequences are for both your mind and your body.

B4991: Building the Nanomachines: a biomolecular approach to creating your own nanomachines
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Enze Chen, Jude Lee

Nanomachines are arguably the coolest sci-fi gadgets of the future. Yet, their creation may be more imminent then you think! In fact, we already know that we ourselves, (and all other living things) are composed of tiny nanomachines called "proteins." And it is our very own bodies that we will find the pieces necessary to create the nanomachines! In this class, we will explore interesting discoveries and insights from molecular biology and nanotechnology in finding the right pieces for the nanomachines.


Engineering

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E4964: Rube Goldberg Challenge

Engineering is all about working together! In this class we will first learn about the different kinds of engineering and then break into groups that are each responsible for building one component of a giant Rube Goldberg machine. The ultimate challenge? Trying to put them all together at the end!

E4775: Introduction to Spaceflight
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jan Kolmas

Overview of rocket propulsion, introduction to the counter-intuitive world of orbital mechanics and discussion of other concepts, such as staging, aerobraking and reentry.


Prerequisites
High school physics (Newton's laws, conservation of momentum)

E4955: Engineering at Stanford
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bradley Emi

Come hear from current engineers at Stanford about what it is like to study engineering in college!

E4901: Intro to Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI)
Difficulty: **

Ever wonder about how to measure brain activity using an MRI? In this class we will discuss the basics of image formation, the physiology underlying the measured BOLD contrast, and various experimental designs.

E4990: Get Your Wings: Learning How to Fly
Difficulty: **

Have you ever looked up to see an airplane flying overhead and wondered how to become a pilot? This class will introduce you to what it takes to become a pilot.

We will learn how pilots communicate on the radio, how they navigate through the airspace in the United States and then you put your new skills into practice as you take a virtual airplane for a spin around the traffic pattern using a simulator.

E4872: Science of 3D Printing
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sharon Chen

What is all the hype surrounding 3D printing about? Why is it considered a revolutionary technology? This class will provide an overview of the capabilities of current 3D printing technologies, their limitations, and how people are trying to achieve better performance. We will then explore specific 3D printing techniques such as fused deposition modeling (extruding hot plastic through a nozzle), stereolithography (curing by ultraviolet light), and selective laser sintering (melting together fine powder), relying on basic chemistry, materials science, and engineering concepts to better understand the principles behind these processes.

E4879: Modern Airplanes
Difficulty: **

Have you ever wondered what goes into making a Boeing 777? How do we get them into the sky, and how do we do it safely? In this class you will learn what makes an airplane fly, why they operate the way they do, and how we can transport millions of people around the world every year. The class might not make you a pilot, but it will make your paper airplane skills will take off!

E4948: Build Your Own Speaker

Each student will build a simple styrofoam cup speaker. We will learn about sound, how speakers work, and basic circuits.


Prerequisites
Please bring a portable music player such as an MP3 player or smartphone if you have one. A few extras will be available to use if you do not have one.

E4978: Materials Gone Wrong!

It's a bad day if your phone screen cracks, but it's something else entirely if your airplane falls out of the sky. Learn about the science and engineering behind materials failures in history through demonstrations and hands-on experiments. Emphasis on HANDS-ON demonstrations, not a boring lecture! We'll experience first-hand how liquid metals can catastrophically destroy structural materials in applications like space exploration and aerospace. We'll explore how many materials can change dramatically with changes in structure, temperature, and other conditions. You'll walk away from this class with greater knowledge of the atomic structure of materials and a deeper appreciation for the diverse properties of the materials that surround our everyday life.

E5018: Mission: Imagination!

Want to solve the world's problems? It all begins with design thinking! In this fun-filled challenge you will have to work as a team to create the most innovative solution to an exciting task handed your way. With just everyday objects as your toolset, you will only be limited by your own imagination. May the odds be ever in your favor!!!

E5036: Introduction to Earthquake Engineering
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cristian Acevedo

Earthquakes are one of Earth's most devastating phenomena. Their effects can damage and even collapse buildings! For these reasons, a good understanding of earthquakes is essential to design and build safe structures. Come learn about earthquakes and ways to design for them! The class will be fun and interactive and it will cover the basic physics behind earthquake engineering design; the focus will be on explaining concepts through demonstrations.

E4927: The Tower Challenge
Difficulty: **

We'll give you the materials. You'll build the tallest tower you possibly can. It's that simple.

E4940: Introduction to Fourier Analysis and Applications
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chao Liu

Fourier analysis is an extremely important and powerful tool used everywhere in engineering and the sciences and basically involves determining the different frequency components of a signal. Without getting into the rigorous mathematics of Fourier analysis, we will start with the basics (eg. "what is frequency") then build up a solid intuitive understanding. Various applications will be presented, such as protein structure determination by diffraction, signal processing, image processing, and signal pathways inside the cell. This class will involve extensive discussions, examples, and questions in addition to lecture.


Prerequisites
math, trig/pre-calc

E4974: So you want to go to Mars...?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Ana Tarano

Imagine you are an astronaut in space. How is your life different from the one you led on Earth? If you wish to learn the answer, this is the course for you! NASA has a program to take astronauts to Mars by 2040. However, there are some hurdles that need to be surmounted. This class will teach you about such hurdles.
Videos of astronauts in space will be shown. An introductory level of physics will be taught in order to expose students to gravitational and electromagnetic forces that affect human biology during space flight. Some biology will also be introduced, namely DNA and basic anatomy. Current problems in protecting humans and mission planning, specifically for missions to Mars, will be explored.


Prerequisites
An interest in space or biology. No physics or biology background necessary!

E4817: Squishy Circuits
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amy Liu

Explore electronics and create circuits using Play-Doh! We'll investigate the difference between a conductor and an insulator and try our hand at crafting series and parallel circuits. Everyone will get the chance to build their own Play-Doh sculpture and figure out how to light it up with LEDs and a battery. The class will be a playful and creative investigation of electricity and the mechanisms that power our homes and the devices we use in our day-to-day lives.


Prerequisites
Excitement and willingness to explore and have fun with science! Course assumes no prior knowledge of electronics/circuitry.

E4912: Real Life Star Wars! - An Intro to Mechatronics and Robotics
Difficulty: ***

Dive into the world of mechatronics by experimenting with Star Wars related robots and machines. Create a lightsaber, program R2D2 to follow the light or the dark side, and experience the real-life force!

This class will you give you hands on experience with several aspects of mechatronics and robotics including creating circuits to light LEDs, program a line-following robot with tape sensors, and experience virtual haptic environments.

The class will be spilt up into teams to accomplish various tasks and compete to rule the Galaxy...


Prerequisites
Basic knowledge of physics would be helpful, but is not necessary. No programming or electronics experience required. But enthusiasm and interest in robotics and mechatronics is strongly encouraged!

E4971: Cool Polymer Science

Polymers are fascinating materials that can be found almost everywhere in our daily lives. From the plastics we buy at the store to the skin on our bones, polymers come in all shapes and sizes. Due to their interesting and special properties, polymers are used in many applications, from flexible materials to electronic devices to complex fluids. In this short course, taught by the Stanford Polymer Collective, we'll learn about polymers through fun hands-on activities that highlight some of their most important properties.


Hobbies

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H4950: Get Roped Into It: Jump Rope
Difficulty: **

Learn how to do incredible jump rope tricks as well as a great fitness routine from members of the nation's second-ever collegiate jump rope team. We are experts in single rope, double dutch, and Chinese wheel who can teach you everything from the basics to elite skills.

H4766: Card Magic
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Drew Lexmond

Ever saw a magician blow your mind with a deck of cards? Want to learn some beginner level card magic to amaze friends, family and strangers? This is for you. All you need is an open mind and nimble fingers. Cards will be provided.


Prerequisites
None. Some previous experience in playing with cards/shuffling is helpful.

H4823: This. Is. Jeopardy!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cameron Kim

Are you a trivia genius? Do you have random useless facts stuck in your head that you need to get out? Has it been a dream of yours to make it a "true daily double"? Why not try your luck on America's Favorite Game Show, Jeopardy! Created by Merv Griffin after a suggestion from his wife, Jeopardy! has become an American cultural icon, spurring celebrities like Ken Jennings, Julia Collins, and parodies on Saturday Night Live. Come learn about the rich history of this game show, how to play it, how to get on the real thing, and play a real game of Jeopardy! from a former Jeopardy! contestant.


Prerequisites
Just a passion for trivia! We'll be using previous Teen Tournament questions for these games.

H4846: Beginning Knitting
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Samantha Zarate

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Always wanted to make beautiful hand-knit garments such as \href{https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/9a/d2/15/9ad215fba4fa23dad62622c64acfc51b.jpg}{Hermione's knit sweater} or \href{http://knityorkcity.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/tumblr_murtq46KYH1r9i187o1_1280.jpg}{Katniss Everdeen's cowl} or \href{http://knityorkcity.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/hobbit-gandalf-scarf.jpg}{Gandalf's lovely scarf}?

Well, you're in luck! Knitting is a very easy hobby to pick up and a great way to keep your dexterity up while creating handmade works of art. With just a few basic skills, you'll be well on your way to knitting elegant things! This class will cover the knit stitch and purl stitch, time permitting. Participants will knit small squares that they can keep!

H4774: Become a Crossword Puzzle Whiz
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Steinberg

This course consists of two activities. In the first, you will work with your classmates to solve a New York Times crossword puzzle from square one! After a short break, you will learn how to make a New York Times-quality crossword through a series of interactive exercises, which range from picking which entries go into a class-constructed grid to determining possible clues for them. After taking this class, you will be able to amaze your friends with some mad crossword skills!

H4826: Playground Games
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Hayden Payne

Is recess your favorite subject? Do you like running around outdoors? Do you want to play games with some new friends? Then this class is for you! We will be learning some new playground games and also playing old favorites like Sharks and Minnows, Freeze Tag, and Red Light, Green Light


Prerequisites
To take this class, you must enjoy playing games outside and practice good sportsmanship. Comfortable clothing is recommended

H4869: Liars Club

Join us for a jam-packed session of playing games dedicated to bluffing and deception: Mafia, Resistance, and Liar's Dice! We, the Liars Club at Stanford, will supply all the materials and teach you all the rules. Feel free to drop in for as many sessions as you like! FUN GUARANTEED.

H4905: Intro to Chinese Chess (Xiangqi)
Difficulty: *

Interested in how each of the pieces in Chinese chess move around on the battlefield (game board) to capture the enemy's general (king)? In this class we will go over the rules and objective of the game; the rest of the time will be game time for practice!

H4833: How to Solve Cryptic Crosswords
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Milind Rao

In cryptic crosswords, candles are wicked things, veto is a spoiled vote, and Thames is the flower of London. Unlike in traditional quick crosswords, clues are packed with wordplay and are quite misleading on the surface. This does not mean they are harder! In class, we will learn a few techniques to see through the skulduggery and then collaboratively solve a full cryptic crossword. These are all the rage in countries ranging from the UK, Kenya, India to Australia and we will hopefully see why!


Prerequisites
You like playing with words (puns have some utility here)!

H4951: Beginning Backpacking
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Mary Chambers

Want to spend the night stargazing in the backcountry, but not sure how to get started? This class will teach basic backpacking skills including gear choice, packing, planning, and basic safety.

H5000: Make an Origami Masterpiece - the Kawasaki Rose Full!
Difficulty: ***

Learn to master the art of Origami with this classic masterpiece, the Kawasaki Rose! Designed by world-renowned origamist/theorist Toshikazu Kawasaki, this piece is regarded by many as the pinnacle of traditional origami.

In this class, we will teach you to fold a variation designed by Akira Yoshizawa: [https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/52/129646871_2ee97f8fb8_b.jpg]. This piece is relatively advanced, so we will walk you through the steps.


Prerequisites
Experience with origami - if you have folded unit origami or multiple pieces besides the crane, you should be able to follow along.

H4761: (Non-contact) Rugby for beginners
Difficulty: **
Teachers: KC Farrell

Rugby is an international sport played with an oblong ball that can only be thrown backwards. After a long hiatus, a form of Rugby called Sevens (7 v 7 with two 7 minute halves) will return to the olympics this summer in Rio!
In this class, we will learn how to pass and kick the rugby ball and how to run plays. The class will culminate in a scrimmage. The class in non-contact, meaning that there will be no tackling, only gentle tagging.


Prerequisites
No jewelry or metal of any kind (no eyeglasses, no metal cleats). Please wear sneakers or soft/rubber cleats and athletic clothing. Please bring a filled water bottle.

H4780: Running 26.2 Miles On Purpose!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Ting

About 2,500 years ago, a Greek Soldier, Pheidippides, ran from Marathon to Athens, without stopping, to deliver news of a military victory against the Persians in the Battle of Marathon.

In 1896, the modern day Olympics included an event known as Marathon, to commemorate Pheidippides's dramatic run.

Come find out the increasingly popular sports of Marathon - why do people run 26.2 miles on purpose, what effect it has in their life, and what it takes to prepare for this amazing and often life changing sporting event!

H4795: Bird Basics
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rebecca Shi

Have you ever seen a cool bird outside and wondered what it was? Come learn a few basics of birdwatching and how to identify backyard and other common birds! After an introduction to IDing birds, we will head outside to search for the common birds around Stanford.

Designed for students who have no experience with identifying birds, but an enthusiasm to learn about the natural world. For students also interested in how birds perceive the world, please see the Bird Senses listings :)

H4831: Broadcast Radio for Beginners
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Caleb Smith

This course will provide students with a basic understanding of radio broadcasting and will involve the actual usage of radio broadcast equipment. Students will tour KZSU Stanford (located at Pigott Theater near Memorial Auditorium) and will include a tutorial on how to use station equipment. Students will leave with an audio recording of their work.


Prerequisites
No technical knowledge required. Attendees are expected to behave themselves.


Life Skills

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L4931: Chill, bro: beginner mindfulness
Difficulty: *

Our lives are full of stressors - it's easy to lose yourself in the storm of school, work, relationships, social media, and more. In order to make it in this world, you need to learn to chill!. This class will provide an introduction to mindfulness, the art of nonjudgemental awareness. Drawing from principles of Zen, meditation, and design thinking, we will learn the essentials of observing and appreciating yourself and the world around you. Through this we hope to take the first steps toward leading a more focused, healthier, and happier life with peace and clarity of mind.


Prerequisites
None

L4754: Intro to Personal Finance
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Melissa Ko

The average American household is thousands of dollars in debt. Learning early on about personal finance can help you avoid money problems down the road!

In this class, we will discuss what you will want to know about finances to make smart decisions with your money.

Come find out little steps that you can take now to practice and build better money habits. Please bring any questions you would like to discuss about personal finance. Note that this is NOT purely an investing class, though we can talk a little about how investing may fit into your saving strategy.


Prerequisites
This class is geared towards complete beginners. If you don’t know or understand credit scores, budgeting, or interest rates, then this is the class for you.

L4989: How to BS
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Yang

Let's dispel once and for all with this fiction that you need to know what you're talking about. You don't need to know EXACTLY what you're talking about.

Facts are useful. But unfortunately, not always available. Luckily for you, this class is all about how to break your crippling dependency on facts. Come learn all about creating information without worrying about inconsequential things such as "reality", or "truth". Become an expert at being an expert. I know what I'm talking about, and so can you!

L4866: Earthquakes: What will you do when the shaking starts?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Daimen Sagastume

This class may save your life.

Where will you be? Who will you be with? It could be tomorrow, or it could be in 5 years: the San Andreas fault will slip, and we will shake.

Scientists have warned that the "Big One" is coming for years, yet here in Northern California, we've sat in utter silence for years...watching...waiting. A recent study found that the San Andreas fault has reached a sufficient stress level for an earthquake of magnitude greater than 7.0 to occur...but when will it be?

Are you ready to potentially face one of the United States biggest disasters? This class offers an engaging and fun approach to exploring California's earthquake risk while teaching you what to do during a major shaking event. But don't worry...while earthquakes are a serious topic, we'll be sure to have some fun during the learning process with movie clips and interactive demos along the way!

Come and learn what to do when the shaking starts before it's too late...

L4920: Justice - What’s the Right Thing to Do?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Bank bailouts. Stealing to feed your hungry kid. Lying to save Jews in your basement. Waterboarding. What’s right and what’s wrong? And how do we know?

This will be a crash course in Ethics, the rigorous discipline of determining what’s right. This lost science will be critical for anyone who will have to make decisions in their life.

I’m modeling this course after the enormously popular class and book taught by Michael Sandel at Harvard (Google my course title).

L4759: How to Dress for the Interview
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Clark

Want that dream job or a chance to get in the door? It all starts with how you dress.

There are 3 ways in which we communicate, visual is one of them. 55% of our communication is visual, so lets take what you wear out of a disadvantage and make it an advantage.

Please come prepared with questions.

Note: Every in person job interview I have ever had, I have gotten a job offer.


Prerequisites
None

L4937: Build Your Brain: Learning and Memory
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Niki Agrawal

Do you want strategies to ace your next exam? Or maybe even to become the next U.S. Memory Champion? Come learn valuable skills to take your learning and memory to the next level!

Ordinary people have accomplished some of the greatest feats of memory ever. How did they do that? In this class, we will explore some practical and proven techniques that you can use to unleash your brainpower.

Build a mighty brain to lead a mighty life!


Prerequisites
BYB - Bring your brain! :)

L4886: The Language of Logic: How to Prove your Point
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua Eggold

What makes a good argument? How can you tell if argument is sound? The answer: logic! In this class we’ll take a look at some basic principles of logic including informal, categorical, and propositional logic, with lots of fun hands-on examples. We’ll also discuss common logical fallacies and how to avoid them. Most importantly we’ll talk about everyday uses of logic and how to spot a good argument. We’ll also be tackling some challenging and fun logic puzzles! IF this sounds like fun, THEN you should attend this class. It’s only logical!

L4891: The Basics of Banking And Finance
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Clark

What do you look for in opening an checking account?

What is credit, how do i build it and what are the basics of credit cards?

Come prepared with all the questions you want answered and I will clarify a lot.

I have been in banking 10+ year and I can help you get started off on the right foot.

L4954: Research at Stanford
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bradley Emi

Come hear about the types of research you can do in college from current Stanford students! There will be information and a question and answer session with students who do research across the sciences and humanities.

L4968: STEM Outreach for Girls: Leadership
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Amara McCune

Interested in getting more involved with STEM and research, and want to learn the skills to go out there and do it? Want to lead an environmental club, apply for science fairs, and become confident in your abilities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics? Come join us for this seminar in leadership!


Prerequisites
Enthusiasm!

L4762: How to chose a college/university where you will be happy
Difficulty: *
Teachers: KC Farrell

Many factors must be considered when choosing a college or university. Financial considerations. Classes. Campus culture. Location. Housing.
This class will offer guided self-reflection to help students chose schools where they could be happy.


Prerequisites
Currently in the equivalent of 11th grade (have one more year left in high school)

L5016: The Art of Small Talk!
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sean Volavong

We've all been in an awkward situation inside a room full of strangers. What did you do? Did you try to talk to someone? Did it go horribly?

For anyone that wants to become friends with that stranger in the elevator to anyone that just wants to know more about the psychology and art of small talk, this is for you!

We'll unfold the art of small talk through interactive activities while getting to know the "strangers" in your class!


Prerequisites
Nothing! Just the willingness to get talking!

L4756: What Every College Science Student Should Know
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yoo Kim

The workshop "What Every College Science Student Should Know" aims to serve as a mentor for the aspiring STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) student. This workshop is a distillation of years of research and interviews with successful scientists and other science students. The workshop will point out the challenges students commonly face when pursuing a science major. We'll focus on choosing a major, mastering study skills and time management, conducting scientific research, finding a job, applying to graduate and professional schools, and, most importantly, how to foster and maintain a lifelong love of science.

L4828: Product Pitch
Difficulty: *

Have you ever tried to sell an item? What about finding a solution to help the city of San Francisco? If you want to learn more about this, come to Product Pitch?

In this course, you will learn to identify problems, break them down, and then find solutions. You will be given groups to work with and a few challenges that you should hope to find a solution for during an allotted time.

L4822: Miss CEO: Becoming An Effective Leader
Difficulty: **

The world needs great leaders to tackle its biggest problems… and that starts with YOU! Although women are underrepresented in today's leadership ranks, this class will inspire and teach you how to position yourself as a leader in high school, college, and beyond. Come learn about relevant leadership skills such as effective negotiation and clear communication that will help you excel in a variety of academic, personal, and professional situations. More importantly you will also learn how to put these skills into practice starting today --including securing dream mentors, finding internships, navigating the college application process, and getting on the right trajectory for career achievement early on. The instructors for this class feature women from the Stanford community who have extensive experience leading and making innovative contributions to their fields. They also have a passion for helping students achieve their leadership potential, which you can learn more about at www.missceo.org.

L4878: How to Talk Your Way into a Job.
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Brian Chau

We need to talk. Those are words you generally don't want to hear. Seriously, we need to talk about talking...or should I say, networking? So, let us practice networking and pick up a few tips on business etiquette, the interview process and the elevator pitch. If time permits, we can discuss about LinkedIn etiquette along with e-mails, thank you notes and other business etiquette.


Prerequisites
If you are considered to be an introvert, do not fret! You, too, can be skilled in networking.

L5013: A Day in the College Student's Life
Difficulty: *

Ever wondered what it's like to be a college student? College is an educational, growing experience unlike any other, but it can sometimes be hard to capture into one sole definition. This class is a panel of Stanford students who want to give you some interesting insights on what the college experience is like and how similar and different it is from any other learning opportunity you may encounter!

L4760: How to be Successful
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Clark

lets examine three key things that can help you be successful in life.


Prerequisites
none

L4818: The Practice of Everyday Happiness
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Carter Osborne

This class explores one simple question: how do we become more happy?

We will use fun activities and interactive practices to learn about the many components of happiness: compassion, gratitude, relaxation, and more.

How can we better express gratitude for others? What is "self-compassion," and how can we use it to enrich our lives? Does being happy actually produce benefits in all the aspects of our daily lives: social, personal, academic, etc? (hint: it does)

Students will leave the class with a number of skills and practices to more effectively manage stress, stay resilient during challenging times, and (most importantly) enrich everyday happiness!


Prerequisites
Positive energy and an open mind!

L4983: How to Become a Better Listener

Are you interested in learning some lifelong skills that could help you become a better friend, build trust, and improve your overall relationships? In this fun, interactive 45-minute workshop, Stanford undergrads from the Bridge Peer Counseling Center on campus will teach you how to gain these valuable skills through becoming a better listener. These skills and practices are used daily by peer counselors to support the Stanford community.


Prerequisites
none!

L4996: Last Minute Cake Decorating
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Rachel Meyer

Have you ever urgently needed a cake decorated? No? Me neither. Would you still like to learn about cake decorating and decorate cake in just a few minutes? We'll spend a bit of time looking at various creative cake techniques, plus some ideas gone horribly wrong. Then we'll spend most of the class time dressing up some cakes (and cookies). And finally, we can give the results a taste test.

Note: taste test will be full of flour and sugar with some butter and egg baked in.

L5023: Acing the Relationship Game
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Divya Ramakrishnan

Have an interview fast approaching? Scared to tell your friend that you're upset? Too shy to approach that cute boy or girl in class? No fear! In this class, you will learn how to ace the relationship game. From professional interactions to friendships gone sour to romantic relationships, you will learn how to navigate the verbal wars and romantic tangles that often come from interacting with fellow members of the human species. I will primarily take my material from the book "How to win friends and influence people" written by Dale Carnegie (a great read, i highly recommend it!) as well as from my copious amounts of experience in college. This will be a very interactive class and sharing of personal experiences will be critical to getting the most out of it. You will also learn a LOT about my own personal stories, so don't feel shy to share your own as we will all get to know each other very well by the end. So please enroll if you are ready to engage! :)


Prerequisites
willingness to openly participate and share ideas

L4758: The Power of the Connection
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Matthew Clark

Learn how simple words, techniques and overlooked behaviors can help you create a lasting impression, as well as expand your network.


Prerequisites
None

L4982: Meditation: Increasing Health and Happiness
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Andrew Guan

Learn how to get more in touch with your inner self, and how to utilize meditation on a regular basis to become healthier, happier, and more mindful of yourself and your surroundings :)


Prerequisites
Come with an open mind!


Lunch

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L5032: Lunch Period
Difficulty: None
Teachers:

Enjoy a break for lunch with your friends! Please register for at least one lunch period on each day of the program.

L5031: Lunch Period
Difficulty: None
Teachers:

Enjoy a break for lunch with your friends! Please register for at least one lunch period on each day of the program.


Mathematics and Computer Science

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M4765: Introduction to cryptography Full!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Anna Thomas

In this class we will learn about the basics of modern public key cryptography, focusing on the RSA algorithm.

M4825: To Infinity and Beyond!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jonathan Kang

Ever wondered what is the biggest number? That's easy! There's no biggest number! But the notion of infinity is more than meets the eye.

In this course, we will attempt to answer questions such as: What do we really mean when we say there are infinitely many natural numbers? How did we arrive at our present understanding of infinity? Are there different kinds of infinities?

The infinite has preoccupied mathematicians and philosophers of centuries past. Come learn more about this fascinating topic!


Prerequisites
Familiarity with algebra, comfort with basic mathematical proofs.

M4867: Physics & Computation
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Hyde

Mathematics, physics, and computer science are connected in fundamental and powerful ways. Modern science combines techniques from all these fields to enhance our understanding of the universe.

In this class I will talk about some of the very cool ways in which physics and computer science interact. I'll spend about half the class talking about computational physics - using computers to solve physics problems - and its applications, which range from nuclear weapons to computer graphics in movies and video games. I'll spend another part of class talking about quantum computers, and the amazing things they can (and can't!) do.

During the class, I'll explain some relevant equations and mathematical ideas. The class should be enjoyable for people at all levels of math, but I am including some more advanced math for students who are interested in the theory (math is the magic behind everything!).


Prerequisites
Algebra is necessary. Geometry may help a bit. Calculus students may be able to get more out of the class, but I am intentionally teaching the class without calculus as a prerequisite! Any physics and programming experience will also give more enjoyment of the class, but nothing is required.

M4969: Alan Turing's Legacy
Difficulty: **

One of the great minds of the 20th century, Alan Turing made enormous contributions to a variety of fields including mathematics, cryptography, computer science, and biology. This class will present a few of the highlights of Turing's career as well as try to understand the significance of these ideas

M4871: The Euler Characteristic and the Unity of Mathematics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Oleg Lazarev

One of the most appealing aspects of modern mathematics is that many seemingly unrelated areas turn out to be closed related. One example of this underlying unity is the Euler characteristic, an integer invariant associated to many types of spaces, that appears in diverse areas of math like graph theory, topology, and geometry. We will first explore the seemingly innocent notion of the Euler characteristic of a graph and then explain why this integer is a "topological invariant." We will then connect the Euler characteristic to geometry and discuss the following interesting "weather" fact: there are always at least two points on the Earth where wind velocity is exactly zero (this would not be true if the Earth were the shape of a donut!).

M4859: Programming 101 with Activities and Illustrations
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yu Dilys Sun

This is a beginner 101 class for programming. We will introduce programming, computer science, and web development fundamentals (key knowledge and concepts) to students with ZERO background.

Please AVOID this class if you have programmed in any manner before. This is a visual, hands-on class ideal for students who are visual learners, artistic, and who may have otherwise be intimidated by math, computer science and engineering in general. This class will introduce important concepts using fun activities and easy-to-understand illustrations.

No need to bring your own computer. We will move around the room demonstrating key concepts. Class time is limited, setting up computer environment will be out of scope.

If you think you can never learn Computer Science, and really dislike math and engineering. This class may change your view forever.


Prerequisites
Zero background in programming

M4918: How to Think with Bayesian Statistics
Difficulty: ***

How should I update my beliefs when I observe new information? How can I account for uncertainty when I’m making a prediction? And once I make that prediction, how confident in it should I be? Bayesian statistics, a pillar of modern machine learning and data science, gives a principled framework for answering these questions. In this class, we will learn how to encode our beliefs about the world in probabilistic mathematical models, use these models to analyze datasets, and see why Bayesian statistics is employed in domains from science to the private sector. And, with high probability, this class will help you apply Bayesian reasoning to situations in everyday life!


Prerequisites
Single variable calculus (derivatives and integrals) is a must. We'll take it from there!

M4986: The Art of Estimation
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Spar

In this class, we are going to learn how to make smart estimates in order to solve both fun theoretical and real world questions. These range from "how tall is a stack of 1 trillion dollars worth of 1 dollar bills?" to "how much volume of air does a human breathe every day."


Prerequisites
None!

M4875: What is Computer Science?
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Nick Troccoli

Computer science is more than just programming - it's learning how to solve problems using computers. This class will teach you the fundamentals of computer science and how to think like a computer scientist: how to solve programming problems, understand what a computer is doing, and most importantly how to approach programming bugs if they come up. Join us and learn what computer science is all about!

M4880: How Much Can We Know? Godel's Incompleteness Theorems and their Implications
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jack Lindsey

In the early 20th century, logician Kurt Godel proved the existence of shocking and profound limits on the ability of any formal system of reasoning (i.e. mathematics!) to establish truth. This class will explain the results of Godel's incompleteness theorems and illustrate the main ideas behind their proof. It will also involve discussion of the implications of the theorems to the philosophy of mathematics, computer science, and human/artificial intelligence.

M4791: Finding the Best - An Introduction to Optimization
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Nicholas Dwork

Math is now often used to find the "best" answer. Examples include: finding the path to get the rocket home with the smallest amount of fuel, or how to best use pesticide to save plants without making superbugs. Answering questions like these is the subject of Optimization. In this talk, I'll introduce the student to optimization, show them some of the techniques used in optimization, and answer some real world problems using the techniques that I showed.


Prerequisites
The student must be enrolled in Pre-Calculus or beyond.

M4852: Introduction to Logic and Set Theory
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Ethan Sussman

How can we provide a powerful and secure foundation for all of mathematics? This was one of the key questions facing mathematicians at the turn of the 20th century. We will first define the notions of a formal system, as well as the notions of "semantics" and "syntanctics". We will then briefly develop a very simple formal system, that of first order logic with set theory, in which essentially all of mathematics may be expressed (using just three logical symbols nonetheless!) and proved. We will then discuss the limitations of such a system, especially Godel's super awesome incompleteness theorems.


Prerequisites
No specific prerequisites necessary, but exposure to proofs would be helpful

M5007: Mathemagic with Cards
Difficulty: **

Take a regular deck of cards. Ask your friend to call out any two values, like 9 and 4, or 10 and Jack. Chant your favorite magic mantra and shuffle the deck in front of him. Then ask him to scan through the deck, and lo and behold! He will find the two values on two consecutive cards in the deck! How did you make that happen?

Welcome to Mathemagic - the art of performing magic tricks which rely on mathematics. In this class, we will demonstrate several card tricks, and explain why they work (including the above trick). Card tricks are a cool way to understand and appreciate mathematical principles from fields as diverse as probability, combinatorics and set theory. Come, fall in love with maths and become a mathemagician!

M4926: Fast Algorithms for Finding Medians
Difficulty: **
Teachers: William Kuszmaul

Given a set of $n$ numbers, can an algorithm find the median in $O(n)$ time? Until the 1970's finding such an algorithm was a major open problem. The only algorithm to come close was quickselect, which used randomization to run in time $O(n)$ \emph{on average}.

In 1973, five of the top computer scientists in the world had an idea. Through a simple technique, they derandomized quickselect, creating one of the coolest algorithms of the century.


Prerequisites
Some prior experience with probability could be useful, but is not required.

M4786: Intro to Password Security
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Yang

Passwords. We use them a lot. We also hear about them getting stolen a lot. There's even several xkcd comics about them (538,792,936,1286).

Come learn a bit about best practices for safely handling passwords, both from the user and service sides.

M4820: Conjecture and Proof
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Jeremy Booher

The number 41 is a sum of two squares (25+16). Can you write 37 as a sum of two squares? How about 43 or 47? To a mathematician, the next obvious step is to find the pattern and make a conjecture. Only once we know what is true is it possible to prove it. We will illustrate how mathematical research is done by finding an answer to the question of which numbers are a sum of two primes and then sketching a proof using the arithmetic of the Gaussian integers.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with the complex numbers and the desire to think about mathematics abstractly

M4966: Classical Ciphers
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Andy Chen, Nitya Mani

How do we make sure that our messages stay safe from prying eyes? The field of cryptography has its roots in a plethora of classical ciphers, such as Caesar, letter substitution, and Vigenere ciphers. In this class, we will first introduce the concepts behind code-breaking. Then, we will explore some fascinating ciphers and break examples of them.


Prerequisites
Introductory algebra or equivalent mathematical maturity

M4792: Logic and Argumentation
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Ryan Holmdahl

How do I convince people that something is true? Why do I believe something is true? In this class, we'll learn about how mathematical logic can help answer these questions. We'll introduce logic as a concept before exploring how it can be used to build strong arguments -- and why it's sometimes useless.

M4815: Mathematics as an Art
Difficulty: **

Just about everything is an art to somebody. All it takes is an open mind to appreciate the aesthetic qualities of a discipline. Mathematics is one such field that is rich in artistic qualities, but is often misrepresented and even butchered by the recipe oriented teaching in schools.

In this class, we'll look at a number of problems whose solutions illuminate the underlying aesthetic appeal behind Mathematics, as well as some theorems which are widely considered to be the most beautiful.

If you're already in love with Mathematics, or interested to see what it has to offer outside of the scope of high school (and possibly undergraduate study), you'll have a great time!


Prerequisites
Knowledge of Algebra. Pre-calculus might be useful, but not all that necessary.

M4999: Basic programming
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Yu-Sheng Chen

Programming skills have been getting more popular in recent years. In this lecture, I'm going to talk about how to approach simple coding questions, and how to learn coding by yourself via online resources. I hope this could be a good start for beginners to this new area.


Prerequisites
None

M4821: Mathematical Problem Solving
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Jeremy Booher

Suppose I have a rectangular bar of chocolate made up of nine squares. I want to separate it into the nine pieces by cutting it with a knife. What is the minimum number of cuts needed to do so? Once you've solved this, can you use the idea to solve other interesting problems? Through answering this question and similar ones, we will explore how mathematicians think about problem solving.

M4873: From Self Driving Cars to Skynet: Ethical Issues In Artificial Intelligence
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Michael Arruza

1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. 2. A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. 3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.
These are the three famous laws of robotics created by Isaac Asimov for his book “I, Robot”, meant to explore how one might try and program a robot to be “ethical”. Many other movies and books have tackled the subject of Artificial Intelligence, often exploring the morality of creating computers whose intelligence rivals our own. However, thanks to modern advancements in A.I., unanswered ethical questions once limited to the realm of science fiction are starting to have relevance in the real world. If a self driving car crashes, who is to blame? Should we so readily allow robots to replace people's jobs? Should we use A.I. to predict who is most likely to commit a crime? We will discuss these questions and more as we survey the ethical issues of modern and future A.I., and try to come up with our own laws of robotics in the process.

M4896: That's So Random
Difficulty: **

What does it mean to be "random"? Is the world inherently deterministic or random?

Many fields of study including statistics, physics, computer science, and philosophy have tried to answer these questions in many different ways. While randomness is frequently viewed as a source of uncertainty, are there ways we can leverage randomness to our advantage?

In this course, we will survey various attempts to answer these questions and more, discussing definitions of randomness, algorithmic and cryptographic applications of randomness, and the existence of randomness in the real world.


Prerequisites
Basic probability (eg. you should be able to compute the probability of getting a sum of 5 when you roll two six-sided dice).

M4789: Making Machines Learn
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Guillermo Angeris

In this class, we'll learn a bit about how we can get machines to predict ridiculous things with relatively little code.

Lately, Machine Learning has lately become a bit of a buzzword everywhere in computer science: everyone's talking about it, but relatively few people know what all it entails. Are machines really going to outsmart us? What all can they do? Will we have robotic overlords soon?

Though the plan isn't quite to answer the latter question, there will certainly be a taste of the first two. It's surprising how much can be done with only a little bit of code!


Prerequisites
Some programming background (we'll be using Python, but Java/C/C++ is totally fine).

M4908: Intelligent Systems in Biology and Engineering
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chris Stock

Evolution designed a remarkably intelligent machine: the human brain. In turn, we humans have attempted to engineer intelligent systems of our own, in the form of computers and the algorithms we run on them. In this class, we will think about layers of abstraction in the brain and compare them to their counterparts in human-built systems. Along the way, we'll try to define intelligence, learn about the tradeoffs human brains have to make during problem solving, and see why it's wrong to say that deep learning "works just like the brain."


Prerequisites
Familiarity with basic algebra and scientific curiosity!

M5001: Zero Knowledge Proofs and Cryptographic Protocols
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andy Chen, Nitya Mani

One of the central tenets of cryptography and more broadly, secure negotiations, is being able to prove to someone you know the solution to a problem that they desire without actually revealing the solution. This idea is prevalent through all of modern cryptography as well as confidential and critical decisionmaking processes. This class will provide an introduction to zero knowledge proofs and their roles in modern voting protocols, cryptography, and secure processes in businesses, the government, and science.


Prerequisites
A second course in Algebra (Algebra 2) or equivalent mathematical maturity

M5022: Entropy and the Redundancy of English
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andrew Guo

Hree's a slpme, wried tcirk taht wlil rlaely iprsmess yuor fnrieds!

Why is it possible for you to understand the above sentence, even though the middle letters in every word is scrambled? What if I start deletng letes, or evn wrds in my? Is it still possible to understand what I am trying to communicate to you?

I claim that, using high-school mathematics, we can achieve a quantitative understanding of the information that is being conveyed in our use of language. It all boils down to one word: entropy.


Prerequisites
Basic understanding of probability and familiarity with logarithms.

M4803: Game Theory: Winning Strategies and Nash Equilibria
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bryan Cheong

How do people make choices, especially if their decisions will affect not only themselves, but also each other? How do they strategise to get the best outcomes for themselves, or for everyone? Game Theory is the study that answers these questions. It has found many applications in mathematics, economics, political science and computer science. With a little bit of simple mathematics, we can obtain great insight on how people behave - or ought to behave - and strategise in a situation. This class will introduce the concepts of best response, dominant strategies and Nash equilibria. We will not only look at simple two-player games, such as the 'Prisoner's Dilemma,' 'Tit for Tat' and 'Battle of the Sexes,' but also discuss other applications of game theory that are less popularly discussed, like auctions, matching for roommates and in a "marriage market," and games over a dynamic (multi-stage) time horizon.


Prerequisites
Practically nothing!

M4827: Logic and Riddles, Or How Many Splash Students Does It Take To Screw In A Lightbulb?
Difficulty: **

How many piano tuners are there in Chicago? Do any two people in New York have the same number of hairs on their head? How do you approach a riddle that seems impossible? This class will cover basic logical techniques for estimation and problem solving. After a short mini-lecture on the subjects of estimation, riddles, and graph theory, students will break into teams and compete against each other to solve the most puzzles. After each competition, we’ll go over the questions and prepare for the next subject. At the end, we’ll share challenging riddles to take home and distribute prizes to the best teams.

M4861: Beautiful Evidence: Using Data To Craft A Compelling Story
Difficulty: **

The amount of data in our world is continually increasing. Good visualization of complex data aids understanding and comprehension. This class will be a fun introduction to creating beautiful, informative and interactive data visualization. We will learn how humans process and perceive visual information/images. We will also explore design principles, good design practices for visualizations, and various visualization tools used in various fields, and we will put them into practice for our own mini projects. A small studio-based, interactive session that combines programming, data science and graphic design, the class will be a fun and educational experience for those who want to learn more about visualization in the age of Big Data!

M4897: Games of Math
Difficulty: **

You might think that you don't need to know any math in order to beat your friends at games. But, you're wrong! Come learn everything you need to know to win at every game.


Prerequisites
None.

M4907: Sneaky Statistics, Perplexing Probability
Difficulty: **

You encounter randomness and chance every single day. Probability and statistics give you the ability to interpret and understand this randomness. In this class, we’ll cover an introduction to portions of these two important subjects, and put them in the context of actual problems: How can you tell if a sequence is random? What is ‘the Wisdom of the Crowd?’ How likely are people in a room to share a birthday? In this interactive workshop, find out the answers to these questions and more!

M4959: Leveraging Nature's Great Ideas to Make Intelligent Decisions
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Eng

MarI/O [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qv6UVOQ0F44] is a program made of neural networks and genetic algorithms that performs well at Super Mario World.

In this course, I will offer a more technical discourse on neural networks and genetic algorithms than the one provided in the MarI/O video, and together we will generalize these approaches to solve more significant problems. I'm open to suggestions for what games you want to beat or what problems you want to solve!

I'm trying to keep the class small; however, if we reach the limit and you're really interested in the class, just shoot me an email at hello@davideng.me and we'll make something work!


Prerequisites
To make this course as accessible as possible, I'm assuming little to no prior knowledge. However, in order to understand the inner workings of these algorithms, a background in calculus and computer science might be helpful. An interest in video games might also be helpful to avoid boredom for the first part of the course.


Physical Science

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P4781: From Transistors to iPhone: The Amazing Journey of The Mysterious Teenage Electrons
Difficulty: **

From the discovery of electron in 1897, to the invention of transistor in 1947, followed by the birth of Silicon Valley in the 1970's, and the arrival iPhone in 2007. 110 years in the making, the teenage electrons have finally arrived in your friendly neighborhood. Come and find out how these teenagers are shaping everything you do in your life, and what lies ahead when these electrons grow up to become adults!


Prerequisites
Ability to stay awake during the class

P4853: The Galileo Affair
Difficulty: *

"Future centuries may find it strange that after he retracted an opinion which had not yet been absolutely prohibited in public... so much rigor should be used against a pitiable old septuagenarian as to keep him in a (private if not public) prison: he is not allowed to return to his city and his house, or to receive visits and comfort from friends. He has infirmities that are almost inseparable from old age and require almost continuous assistance.... This shook my heart and drove me to tears, as I considered the vicissitudes of human affairs and the fact that he had had so many uncommon honors and accomplishments, whose memory will last for centuries." (December 5, 1634, Peiresc's plea for a pardon)

In 1633, the Roman inquisition condemned Galileo as a suspected heretic for defending Copernicus's hypothesis of the earth's motion, and denying the scientific authority of Scripture. This incident is the most cited one in the history of science-religion interactions. Does the trial of Galileo epitomize the conflict between enlightened science and dogmatic religion? We will go beyond the simple narratives of that story to look deeper into the scientific, religious, philosophical and personal issues at stake in this controversy, based on what the original documents and letters say.

Note: This is a history of science class, not a regular science class.

P4874: Universe or Multiverse?
Difficulty: **

We'll be discussing different theories about the current state of our universe. are we unique? the only ones out there? If we aren't the only ones, what else is there and how many? We will talk about basic theories for the multiverse such as bubble universes or many worlds theory. We'll also touch upon basic astronomy concepts such as the big bang, and space time.


Prerequisites
Interest in astronomy, and basic science knowledge.

P4979: The Exotic Physics of Phase Transitions
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Joshua Straquadine

You already know about the different phases of matter: solid, liquid, and gas. But what actually causes one phase to transform into another? The study of these phase transitions has opened up a massive, exciting, and beautiful part of physics and deepened our understanding of the universe. In this class, I'll describe some of the basic ideas and techniques we use to understand phase transitions, and show you how it can apply to so much more than boiling water!

P4799: Let's make science with science fictions
Difficulty: **
Teachers: arthur morlot

Have you ever wondered how a lightsaber might work ? Why interstellar ships have this funny look or how the force works ?

In this class, we will try to answer these questions and many more by analyzing scenes from your favourite movies with physicist eyes

P4811: Introduction to Special Relativity
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexandre Gauthier

Special relativity describes the behavior of systems moving at speeds close to the speed of light. Once you start moving so fast, a lot of weird stuff starts to happen.

We will discuss Einstein's postulates, the two statements which form the foundation of special relativity. Then we will introduce time dilation - the bizarre idea that "moving clocks tick slower."


Prerequisites
An understanding of algebra would be helpful, but is not necessary.

P4868: Garage Sale Physics
Difficulty: *

Ever found yourself wondering what the abstract equations in your physics textbook mean. Ever wondered why you require a multi billion dollar LHC facility to do science. We here present you the excitement of science, especially physics on the scale that you can do at home, understand key concepts by doing simple experiments and also, have some fun with a liquid (nitrogen) at -320 Fahrenheit. Come join us for this highly interactive class.


Prerequisites
Curiosity and enthusiasm!

P4824: The Physics of Curling
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Cameron Kim

Often called "chess on ice," curling is beginning to infiltrate the United States at a very quick pace. Curling clubs are popping up all across the nation and more amateur curlers are joining the sport every year. But how does it work? Why does curling seem to defy physical laws of motion? What good does sweeping really do? And how important is it to yell at your team while on the ice? Come learn about the history of the sport, how it's played and its rich history, and the controversial science of curling! You'll also learn how to participate in curling in the Bay Area.


Prerequisites
A background in physical sciences will be helpful, but concepts addressed will be in context of curling (don't worry, most curlers don't understand the physics either, but we know how to play). No curling experience is required.

P4829: Chemistry of Food

Examine the Chemistry of Salsa. Why is it hot? Why don't some people like cilantro. We will explore interesting ways chemistry governs flavor and discuss how the structure of molecules governs flavor.

P4832: The Science of Invisibility
Difficulty: *

Harry Potter has an invisibility cloak - can we make one, too? This class will explore the basic science behind invisibility through a series of interactive demos, and we'll explain how they work. We will also talk about some of the cutting edge research being done on cloaking today!

P4898: Marking Cancer Through Molecules
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Devleena Samanta

Diagnosing cancer at an early stage is of utmost importance to ensure proper treatment. The most common way of finding out if a patient has cancer or not is histopathology in which a "biopsy" section is looked at under the microscope by an expert. This by-eye-only method leads to significant rates of misdiagnosis.

Come find out how Desorption Electrospray Ionization Coupled to Mass Spectrometric Imaging can help to identify cancer margins, based on the molecular profile of the tissue.

P4841: Group theory for chemistry applications
Difficulty: **

Symmetry is beautiful! In this course you will learn how chemists can predict material properties just by looking at the beautiful shapes of molecules.


Prerequisites
Basic chemistry course

P4967: STEM Outreach for Girls: Physics and Astronomy
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Amara McCune

What is the universe made of? Why can nothing travel faster than the speed of light? If you are interested in the types of objects in the universe, and the fundamental theories we use to explore it, then this class is for you! Come learn about black holes, how time and space can stretch, and why physics is cool.


Prerequisites
Curiosity and a sense of enthusiasm.

P4854: The Shape of the Earth
Difficulty: *

"Is there anyone so senseless as to believe that (on the other side of the earth) there are men whose footsteps are higher than their heads?... That crops and trees grow downwards? That the rains and snow and hail fall upwards to the earth?" (Lactantius, 4th century CE)

There was a time when people across different cultures believed that the earth was more or less flat, not because they were stupid in any way, but because reasoning by common sense led them to it. Even many of the best philosophers in ancient Greece adhered to some version of a flat earth viewpoint. How did some of the philosophers (or 'scientists' of the time) begin to claim that the earth was spherical? What observations and arguments led them to it? In this course, we will imagine travelling back in time to the ancient world, two thousand years before the advent of modern science, and understand how educated people convinced themselves and the others that the earth was really spherical, without satellite pictures and the ability to circumnavigate the world. We will look at the mixture of right and wrong arguments offered by the key philosophers and astronomers of the time, including Aristotle and Ptolemy. Along the way, we will also understand the physics of Aristotle (which was the dominant physics for 2000 years), and the ancient astronomical explanations of eclipses and the phases of the moon.

Note: This is a history of science class, not a regular science class.

P4936: A Crash Course in Chemistry Puzzles (Spectroscopy)
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bryce Cai

Ever wanted to solve problems in chemistry that aren't just multiplying some ratios over and over? Ever wondered how scientists can look at a solution or a drug and say, "this definitely contains this really complicated molecule"? Ever sat through chemistry class and wondered, "When will this actually be useful? Can't a computer do this already?" In this class, you'll get to explore a topic that covers all of these questions and solve some puzzles at the same time. We'll cover some basics of organic chemistry, followed by an exploration of spectroscopy, a technique that allows scientists to decode the structures of elaborate molecules. You'll find that, once you combine data from different spectroscopic techniques, you'll be able to do this too! They're logic puzzles -- just like sudokus and crosswords, except easier, just as fun, and extremely useful. At the end, we'll discuss how spectroscopy and organic chemistry are intertwined and how the latter is a lot like the former, revolving around puzzles as well. This will be a class with plenty of puzzle handouts; we'll solve problems together, and you'll have some to take home if you really want to do more!


Prerequisites
High school/basic chemistry is highly recommended, but when it comes down to it, just a knack for puzzles is all that's required!

P4972: Climate Change: Past, Present and Future
Difficulty: **

Come learn about the climate system! We'll discuss the geologic time line of the earth and then focus in on the anthropocene to understand how we are affecting the climate.

P4984: Storms! Tornadoes! Lightning!
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sienna White

In this class, we'll talk about storms-- how they form, what they do, and how you can learn to predict them yourself. Ever wondered how a tornado could drive a piece of cardboard through a tree? This is your chance to find out!

P5011: Legos to Lightsabers: A Journey through the Phases of Matter
Difficulty: *

Beginning with legos (solids) and ending with lightsabers (plasmas), we will traverse the predominant phases of matter in our universe and the fundamental properties that unify and differentiate them. This class will include hands-on demos for students to "feel the difference" and come away with the understanding that while they may look and feel different, legos and lightsabers aren't that different after all.


Prerequisites
Familiarity with atoms and molecules and a curiosity about science

P5020: From Molecular Motion to Biological Machines with Langevin Dynamics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bruno Beltran

Did you know that your body is made up of more than 7,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 molecules?

From zebra stripes to patterns on snakes to the spacing between the bones in your spine, biological systems have to control their organization by positioning individual molecular signals in this sea of molecules.

With so many chemicals floating around, how do organisms control the position of individual types?

In the first half of the class, we will learn how to use simple ideas from physics to mathematically describe the motion of individual molecules diffusing and reacting in a biological system. We will learn exactly it means for something to move around "randomly", and use this new understanding to derive the "Langevin Dynamics" approach to atomic simulation using only the simple fact that molecules react by colliding with each other.

In the second half of the class, we will use our new physics knowledge to work as a class on a real question from biology. Example questions that will be chosen from are: How can an embryo create the pattern of signals needed to form its spinal column during development? How can the tiny bacterial cells all around us move the two copies of their DNA into each new cell when they split in two, even without anything to pull two copies of the DNA apart? Students will have a chance to see what it feels like to do work on the cutting edge of these fields. There will also be cool videos of each system to help the class decide what to work on.


Prerequisites
Students should have encountered the idea that all matter is made of molecules, and that molecular reactions happen when two molecules collide with each other. Students should be able to follow every step of the math as long as they are comfortable with the material in Calculus I. Necessary topics from probability theory and differential equations will be introduced during class. This class is a follow up for "B5012: From Bouncing Molecules to Stripes and Spines". That class is not a strict per-requisite, but will help the student get more out of the second half of the class.

P4800: Let's make science with super-heroes
Difficulty: **
Teachers: arthur morlot

We all know that superman is all-powerfull. But have you ever wondered how much ?

Do you whant to know what ant-man main problem is ?

Will we one day be able to master the force ?

Join us this weekend for a class that will analyze with the eyes of a physicist a broad range of supeheroes power. From superman to Godzilla, come and discover that their might be more science than what you expected in your favourite science - fiction comics.

P5010: Exploring Einstein's Special Relativity
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Lawrence Chiou

As Einstein posited at the turn of the last century, if we accept that the speed of light is the universal “speed limit” and that the laws of physics are the same to all inertial observers, then a simple thought experiment reveals stunning inconsistencies in the foundations of Newtonian physics.

The theory of special relativity is elegant enough that starting with nothing but two simple postulates and a little algebra, we can derive and explain all of the fundamental results. We will also discuss some rudimentary aspects of relativistic dynamics (which requires a third assumption).

P4882: Plastic, the Modern Material
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Samuel Jacobo

We will briefly discuss the historical origin of plastic and its impact in the world. We will demonstrate examples of early products and have fun demos that students can take part in to make their very own plastic compounds. Furthermore, we will delve into the polymer chemistry involved in these products and discuss their chemical synthesis. Then, we will conclude our presentation by examining the environmental impacts plastic has and its use in the future.

P4941: History of Physics
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Bradley Emi

Physics is often considered the oldest science, and thinkers since the Ancient Greeks have long been debating fundamental questions about space, time, the constituents of the universe, and how they interact. These ideas have certainly evolved over time as physicists are constantly revising the work of the past, often leading to entirely new trends in scientific thought. Thomas Kuhn describes these as "paradigm shifts" in The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.

In this class, we will revisit these basic questions, asking ourselves what it truly means for something to be a physical theory, and for a theory to be fundamental. We will consider and discuss a definition of physics and what it seeks and does not seek to prove. We will start with how Aristotle and his contemporaries addressed these issues, then discuss the scientific revolution and how Newton's groundbreaking philosophy changed the course of physics until the 20th century. We will finally discuss the breakdown of Newtonian physics, and how quantum mechanics and Einstein's theory of relativity came to the forefront of physics research. We will end by discussing current research in physics, including string theory, quantum gravity, and cosmology, and talk about how these new theories address the same difficulties physicists have faced throughout history.

There is no prerequisite for this class. We will go over all the relevant theories of physics on a very conceptual level. However, students with extended background in physics, or an interest in deeper mathematical insight into physical theories are encouraged to attend, as we will distribute additional material at a more advanced level for interested students. Students interested in philosophy and the philosophy of science are especially encouraged to sign up!

***Students who have previously taken this class: some of the first part of the class will be repeated material, but the second part will go through some restructuring to cover a broader range of topics, and we will have some new activities! It should be worthwhile to retake.

P4925: Real Science: What It Is and How to Spot BS
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Lots of people talk about what “Scientists say” and what is “experimentally proven”. We all want to be rational and make good decisions.

But what is science, really? And how do you know when someone is just trying to BS you by throwing around the word “science”? We’ll talk about that, and, like real scientists, do some real experiments.

P5006: The Science of Global Warming
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Lebel

This class will present some scientific studies relating to climate change. We will investigate the principles of the greenhouse effect to learn why emitting greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, will cause the global temperatures to rise.


Prerequisites
Algebra

P4855: Great Scientists-Kepler
Difficulty: **

Want to know how we moved from a geocentric model to the heliocentric model of the universe? Did you know the person after whom NASA named one of their space shuttle? Learn about the key scientific figure, Kepler, who was instrumental in putting the heliocentric model of Copernicus on firm ground. In this course, we will see how his tenacity and perseverance led to development of his three laws of planetary motion that inspired Newton’s universal of gravitation. Along the way, we will look at his legendary tussle with Tycho Brahe without whose observations Kepler could not have made much headway in his theories. We add to this, his work in explaining human vision and behavior of telescopes and his work on logarithms. And we will look at Kepler and his times, how his religious beliefs influenced his writings, how he devoted as much time to astrology as to astronomy and much more.

P4930: Lighting the World
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Andy Vu

Let's explore how humans made light from ancient times until now. We will talk about everything from fire and oil lamps to incandescent light-bulbs and LEDs. There will be in-class demonstration of different light sources and you will get a chance to make your own light source.

P5014: Why Blue Should be Your Favorite Color
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Katherine Sytwu

Blue is such an interesting color - it's difficult to find in nature, it was the last LED color to be created (and recently won a Noble prize!), and by all means, should be the most difficult color to perceive. In this class, we'll go through some fun science stories related to the color blue - how do we see the color blue? Why was it such a special color in history? Why are the wings of the morpho butterfly such a bright blue? Why was the blue LED so difficult to make? And of course, why is the sky blue?

P4802: Fun with Chemistry!

Chemistry is exciting and it happens all around us every day. In this class we will talk about the states of matter, a little about polymers (like plastics), and really anything else that gives us a chance to do cool demos for you all! You may get a chance to make a souvenir to take home, too. You'll just have to come and find out!

P4856: Great Scientists-Newton
Difficulty: **

Considered by some to be the greatest “scientist” (natural philosopher would be the word used back then!) of all time, Newton shaped the modern world in ways too numerous to mention. In this course, we will go through his most important contributions: the laws of optics, the binomial theorem, integral and differential calculus, laws of motion and above all his crowning glory, the universal law of gravitation. But we won’t stop there! We will also discuss his other “outlandish” interests like alchemy and iconic fights with contemporary scientists like Leibniz and Hooke that divided continental Europe and England. Let us embark on the journey to understand the complete man that Newton was: a loner, a genius, a celibate, a heretic and a bitter critic of his rivals and the first person in England to get state funeral whose attainment lay in the realm of the mind.

P4942: Physics of the Solid Earth
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Ethan Williams

We often consider the Earth as a solid rock floating in space. Yet, natural processes like volcanoes and earthquakes show us just how dynamic the interior of the Earth must be. This class uses the principles of Newtonian mechanics and basic calculus to explore the physics behind our planet Earth. We will look at the structure and composition of the Earth, processes of flow and magma generation in the mantle, the formation and evolution of the continents, and the physics of crustal deformation. If you’ve ever wondered why earthquakes happen, this is the class for you! No background in geology is assumed.


Prerequisites
High school physics; basic calculus through derivatives


Social Science

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S4935: What if you had to walk to Germany?
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Suraj Bulchand

The civil war in Syria is one of the worst humanitarian crises of our time. More than 10 million people have been displaced and more than 200,000 people have died as a direct result of the five-year conflict that has shown no signs of abating. The United Nations Children's Fund, or UNICEF, has been heavily involved in relief efforts for the crisis: increasing access to quality health care, promoting non-discriminatory access to education and strengthening national child protection systems. In this class, we will learn about UNICEF & its missions, the Syrian refugee crisis and about what you can do to contribute to the cause. Through videos, presentations and discussions, we will come to know of the severity of the crisis and the critical state of millions who fight to stay alive each day. The power you hold to create positive, disruptive change in this world is not trivial; it is our hope that with the knowledge you gain from this class, you will harness that power in whatever capacity you can to change the lives of the millions of refugees waiting for a brighter day.

S4890: The American Civil War
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexandra Stern

Few events in American history match the significance of the Civil War, a conflict that freed 4 million people held in bondage and left 750,000 men dead. Seeking to understand why the Civil War is so important to our history and why Americans seem to love their civil war, this seminar will explore the war from a range of perspectives, including those of Union and Confederate soldiers, African Americans, women, and Native Americans. Based on the documents these different groups left behind, as well as the histories they inspired, we will seek, as historians, to understand how the Civil War was experienced and commemorated.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of the American Civil War will be helpful.

S5021: The inner machinations of my mind...
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Hannah Slater

...are an enigma.

Are we really in control of our own thoughts and actions? How much does social influence really affect us? This class will give an introduction to social psychology exploring the many ways in which people conform to others.


Prerequisites
An interest in Psychology

S4819: How to be an American Politician
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Carter Osborne

It's no secret that Americans don't like Congress. In fact, people in the US report liking traffic jams, lice, cockroaches, and root canals all more than our very own federal legislature! What's going on here?

Why don't politicians just do the things that the American public wants? Why do they purposefully do things (or refuse to do things) that make them unpopular with We the People? Why do they fight with each other all the time? What's wrong with these people?!

In this seminar, we'll discuss the many aspects of being an American politician, and explain why they do what they do. We will primarily focus on Congress, but will also touch on the presidency and the Supreme Court. Topics covered include: campaigning, polarization, obstructionism, voting in Congress, and why on earth we can't all just get along.


Prerequisites
An open mind and a desire to learn!

S4857: Discover the Other Facets of AFRICA
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Pascale Guiton

It is very true that poverty and war plague the African continent, but this course will introduce you to the beautiful people and the cultural diversity and riches of the craddle of life: The African Continent.


Prerequisites
Interests in other cultures

S4911: An Introduction to Economics
Difficulty: **

What is economics? Why are politicians so concerned with fiscal policy? What is fiscal policy?? Who are John Maynard Keynes and Milton Friedman anyway? “An Introduction to Economics” will answer all these vital questions plus more. In this class, we will cover the fundamental economic concepts you need to know for school and life. If you enjoy history, come on down and learn about the invisible economic forces acting on the world’s historical narrative. If you are an aspiring politician, this class is perfect for you too! If you enjoy math, we need you as well in order to help us solve important problems involving price elasticity and GDP. “An Introduction to Economics" has something to offer everyone. See you there!

S4877: Philosophical Crises: How Technology is Demanding Answers from Age-old Philosophical Questions
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Nikhil Garg

How do we know that other people aren't just very convincing mindless zombies? Is it morally permissible to kill one to save others? If we could manufacture better humans, should we?

Recent and upcoming technological advances -- autonomous vehicles, robots that pass the Turing test, and genome engineering, for example -- demand answers to questions that hitherto have been solely in the realm of philosophical thought experiments, questions that have remained unanswered after thousands of years of thought.

In this class, we discuss these questions, what they mean for the world we are building, and whether it is even possible to answer them -- and what happens if we can't.

The class will be self-contained -- all necessary philosophy and technological background will be given.

S4956: The Inside Out of Inside Out
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Marcus Gomez, Jenny Han

Did Inside Out make you cry? (It’s ok to admit!!) Do you relate to Riley and her teenage experiences? Do you ever feel like you identify with a particular character from Inside Out besides Joy? Did you know that there are two missing human emotions not featured in Riley’s Headquarters?

Come and learn about what really goes on inside your brain! We’ll discuss how Inside Out actually depicts real neuroscience and psychological principles / theories super well but also what Pixar got wrong. Be ready for an emotional roller coaster.


Prerequisites
Students should either have watched Inside Out or be okay with spoilers!

S5009: Military 101
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Sandeep Arakali

You always see those brave men and women on TV in their uniforms and medals being celebrated for heroism. But what is the difference between the Army and the Marine Corps? Why does the Navy have more fighter jets than the Air Force? Learning about the military and how it works is essential to being an informed citizen. Take this class to explore the different branches of the armed forces, as well as some of the groundbreaking technology that drives our military forward in the 21st century from lasers to drones to hypersonic missiles.

S4998: California Proposition 13: "a sacred doctrine"
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Jose Hernandez

This class will focus on the rich narrative of how and why Proposition 13 was passed.

Gov. Jerry Brown called it "a sacred doctrine," but others have called it the death of public schools. What is this controversy all about?

After WWII, new homeowners in California experienced a series of tax hikes that overwhelmed their household budgets. People responded with Proposition 13, which capped property tax increases.

Many city services are dependent on property taxes, such as public schools.
However, since many public schools were dependent on property taxes, this severely cut school funding from taxes (by 50% in some areas!).

How did this proposition come about? This is where the story gets interesting. The proposition has roots in the great depression, WWII, blue collar jobs, and more. Each piece unfolds a key part of the history, and, when they come together, they create an engrossing story about people's hatred for taxes.

S4814: Be Psyched! Learn and Design a Social Psychology Experiment
Difficulty: **

Are you curious about psychology? Have you ever wondered how psychologists come up with questions and test those ideas? Do you want to design YOUR OWN psychology experiment? In this class, we will give you a crash course on research design in social psychology--a sector of psychology that studies human thinking, feeling, and behaviors in a social setting. Then, you will work in a group to design an actual social psychology experiment, and share your work with the class. At the end of it, you will walk away with basic understanding of how to design a social psychology experiment, and an experiment design of your own that you can collect data for if you want! (The class will take approximately 2 hours with a break)

S4894: In the Devil's Snare: The History of the Salem Witch Trials
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Alexandra Stern

Witch hunting was hardly an unusual practice in early modern Europe. However, the long history of the practice cannot adequately explain the Salem witch trials of the 1690s, in which over 200 people were accused of witchcraft. Exploring the history of Puritan life and belief in colonial America and using primary source evidence from the trials, we will seek to determine and understand the origins of the mass hysteria that produced one of the most infamous and bloody witch hunts in American history.


Prerequisites
Just an interest in early American history.

S4881: Designing Voting Systems
Difficulty: **

When deciding between two options, it's easy to use majority rule to come to a consensus. Things get tricky, however, when there are more alternatives. We'll take a look at different systematic ways to conduct votes and analyze their benefits and drawbacks. In fact, we'll prove that there exist inherent limitations on any such system - that, in some sense, it's impossible to have a "perfect" voting system. And, of course, we'll include some discussion of the 2016 election!

S4960: The American Presidency
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Carter Osborne

Who is the greatest president of all time? George Washington? Abraham Lincoln? How about the only Stanford graduate, Herbert Hoover (although he's not a very popular choice)? While this is fun to think about, this class will explore a deeper question: what made our country's greatest presidents so...well... great?

This class will look at arguably the most powerful office in the world, the American presidency, and discuss what makes for a truly great president. We'll cover everything from campaigns to executive orders, from fighting with Congress to international negotiation. And don't worry, there will be plenty of entertaining and mind-blowing stories about presidents and politics along the way.


Prerequisites
Some knowledge of the US political system is preferred, but not required. An interest in politics. An open mind!

S4997: Everything is Made Up!: Social Construction in the Real World
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chelsey Pan

Have you ever wondered how art gets famous? Or why we all seem to know what it means to be a boy, or be a girl? Or how about why people go to college? Why do these blurbs always seem to start with questions anyway?

In this class, we're going to make things strange. We'll look at some of the things we take for granted as true and examine how and why they came to be that way. Along the way, we'll touch upon social construction, socialization (big buzz words, I know!), and even some social psychology.

This class will be, in part, discussion based, so get ready to chat!

S4929: Crash Course in Christian History
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

In the first century, Jesus of Nazareth started a movement that would change the world. It's a story that takes place in the colosseum of Rome, to the emperor's palace; from barbarian forests to glittering cathedrals; from the front lines of the Crusades to the nonviolent sit-ins of Dr. King. Creeds, Crusades, Cathedrals, Witch Hunts, Universities, Wars of Religion, will all be covered and put in historical context. We will look at key figures, events, and ideas from a variety of perspectives to try to understand the arc of Christian history and it's impact on the world.

S4787: A Republican and a Democrat Walk Into a Bar...
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Sam Ginn, Spencer Segal

Why can't we all just get along? Whether you're a Tea Partier or you're feeling the Bern (or anywhere in between!), this class will help you to understand the increasing divisions in American politics, and will include discussion of the underlying reasons and possible solutions for this problem.


Prerequisites
Humor and a can-do attitude.

S4922: The Birth of Science
Difficulty: **
Teachers: David Carreon

Where did science come from? Who were the heroes who invented it? Why wasn't it invented sooner?

In this class, we'll talk about the exciting story of how we went from alchemy to chemistry, from astrology to astronomy. We'll talk about the epic debate about whether it was the earth or the sun in the center of the universe, discussing the discoveries and politics involved. You'll hear about popes and kings, monks and bishops, and even a few professors.

If that's not enough, I'll tell you:

*Why practically nobody thought the earth was flat
*How Galileo accomplished the greatest troll of all time
*Why it's really hard to prove that the earth revolves around the sun (without satellites)

S4985: International Women's Health
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Claire Howlett

What are the biggest health issues facing women and girls at the international level? What is the relationship between health and human rights? How does poverty impact health? Why should we care? We'll talk about health issues that impact women at different stages of life and the link between health and empowerment. We will also explore different policies and programs that are working to address these issues.

S4994: Japan 101
Difficulty: **

An easy introduction to Japanese culture through food, art, and general activities.
If you don't know anything about Japan, or are even vaguely interested, this class is for you!


Prerequisites
none!


Visual and Performing Arts

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V4987: Intro to Improv
Difficulty: *

We will touch on the basics of improv theory, from saying yes and sharing control, to delving into characters and the beginning of coherent scenes. Improv is an activity that builds chemistry between the members of the ensemble. This is a class that not only helps make you a better performer, but also hopes to teach useful skills for the world beyond the stage.

V5005: 1000 Years of Music: Part 1
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Timothy Anderson

Covers music history from prehistoric music through Beethoven. Will focus on Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical composers (1-2 from each period), and will cover the biographical and historical context of a few key composers and the innovative theoretical and philosophical aspects of their music.


Prerequisites
Background in music theory strongly recommended but not necessary.

V4892: Diversity in Theatre
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Leena Yin

Interested in theater? Then this class is for you!

From Shakespeare to Fresh Off the Boat, all of us have favorite TV shows, movies, or plays—stories we enjoy watching on screen or on stage. In a country with so many different kinds of people, who gets to tell these stories? Can a Chinese girl be Juliet? Should a white actress play a Asian woman? Develop your acting skills while exploring these questions and more with the Stanford Asian American Theater Project. No experience needed, just a willingness to discuss and participate!

V4945: Harmony Hacks
Difficulty: ***
Teachers: Vishesh Gupta

Tired of the same old 4-chord songs?

We're going to discuss the following tools to spice up your chord changes

-- color chords and related scales
-- chord substitutions
-- changing the cadence
-- modulating keys
-- going modal

Everything here is going to be completely opinion-based so come prepared to learn some new ideas and make your own judgements as to what sounds good or bad! I'm just going to be presenting some ideas and you can mess around with them yourself.

I'll also leave the last half of class open for you to bring up your own ideas and we can discuss them openly together.


Prerequisites
C Dm G7 C is a I ii V7 I chord change. Yes? No? If you know, you're probably good. In general - strong understanding of how chords work and how to read chord symbols. You can teach yourself by playing around: http://www.tsmp.org/keyboard/lias/pdf/symbols.pdf It's my first time doing this class, so I'll be sure to tailor it to whoever's there.

V5004: 1000 Years of Music: Part 2
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Timothy Anderson

Covers music history from late Beethoven to modern music. Will focus on the transition from Classical to Romantic styles, the Romantic era, and how this led to Impressionism, 20th Century music, and beyond. We will survey the biographical and historical contexts of key composers and the innovative theoretical and philosophical aspects of their music.


Prerequisites
Background in music theory is strongly recommended but not necessary.

V4801: Freestyle Rap
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Benjamin Bravo

Participants will learn about the importance of rhythm and rhyming in rap. Participants can practice their free style rap skills in front of a friendly audience (their peers). I will provide some helpful tips and a wide range of instrumental music for free style rapping. The usage of profanity and racial slurs are prohibited.

V4977: Make Comics Like a Professional Comics Maker
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Grace Klein

Are you interested in comics or graphic novels? Do you love art and story telling but have never been able to combine the two? Do you love to read comics but have never touched a pencil and a sketchbook before in your life? Are you tired of rhetorical questions?

Come to this comics workshop to learn the basics of creating sleek, readable comics and graphic narratives! (Put on by Stanford's very own Comics Club.)


Prerequisites
A pencil!

V5003: The Music and the Math
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Timothy Anderson

Introduction to the math and physics behind waves with a focus on sound waves and how the physical properties of sound has been a driving force behind music history and evolution. First half of the class will focus on a conceptual introduction to the math and physics of waves, second half will focus on how music history, analysis, and composition relates to the material from the first half. Goal of this class is to use the math and physics of music to answer the question “what is music and what makes it sound good?”


Prerequisites
Math portion: class will be mainly conceptual and geared towards those with math up to Geometry or Precalculus. Music portion: some foundation in music required; ability to read music and play an instrument or sing is preferable but not required.

V4943: Dance of the Overtones
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Vishesh Gupta

Have you ever wondered why music works the way it does?
We'll build the ideas of consonance (sounding good) and dissonance (sounding bad) from scratch, starting with the properties of a vibrating string!
Then we'll extend our ideas to the major scale/chord, with a focus on WHY these particular musical constructs sound the way they do.


Prerequisites
Should understand that sound is a wave composed of multiple frequencies, and be comfortable with algebra. You need NO understanding of music, although it will help to have played something before.

V4970: Intro to Conducting
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Eric Lebel

Ever wondered what it takes to learn to conduct an ensemble? In this course, we will explore the basic principles of conducting with an emphasis on developing a pattern and adding articulation and expression. Students should be able to leave this course with a general understanding of how to effectively conduct a simple piece of music in front of any ensemble.


Prerequisites
Basic ability to read music notes and rhythms and understand music terminology

V4910: Performing Shakespeare
Difficulty: *
Teachers: Anton de Leon

Work with students in the Stanford Shakespeare Company to read and perform short scenes by the Immortal Bard! No theater or Shakespeare experience necessary. If you love Shakespeare, this is the place for you; if you have never read or seen Shakespeare, this is also the place for you! All are welcome! What fun!


Prerequisites
Just a lot of energy and a readiness to have fun!

V4944: Taylor Swift, meet Bach
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Vishesh Gupta

What do Taylor Swift and Bach have in common? In this class we will investigate the underpinnings of music, starting with notes, intervals, and moving up to chords and chord progressions.

Then we will look at famous old composers and compare their music to the modern generation!

You'll be able to write yourself a hit song at the end of this class :)


Prerequisites
Should be able to read the notes on the staff. This class is geared towards students who have yet to learn music theory, but have played music.

V5024: Music of the Medieval Mediterranean
Difficulty: **
Teachers: Chris Stock

Gregorian chant, troubadours, and choir music: Remarkably, these "greatest hits" of the medieval period are still commonly known today, a thousand years after their time. Yet such long-lasting artistic achievements encompass just a fraction of the rich musical soundscape of the medieval Mediterranean, where religious, political, and linguistic influences shaped diverse and interwoven traditions. In this course, we will trek from the Byzantine Empire (Turkey and Greece) to the Langue d'Oc (France) and Al-Andalus (Spain); from the numerous forms of early chant to songs of Sufi Islamic worship and of courtly love. This class will have plenty of listening to and discussing music -- if you want to apply a critical eye to topics diverse as history, geography, and religion through the lens of music, come join us!