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ESP Biography



JIANG YANG, Stanford research fellow in Chemistry




Major: Chemistry

College/Employer: Stanford

Year of Graduation: 2015

Picture of Jiang Yang

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Jiang finished his undergraduate study in Zhejiang University in Biotechnology and obtained his Master's degree in University of Leeds, UK in Biosciences. His Ph.D. was completed in University of Wisconsin-Madison in Biological Engineering before he joined Stanford in the department of Chemistry. His research topic is to use plasmonic materials for health care and biological applications.



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

B3991: Diabetes: introduction, diagnostics and prevention in Splash Fall 2014 (Nov. 08 - 09, 2014)
Diabetes mellitus (DM), or simply diabetes, is a group of metabolic diseases with high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period. Diabetic patients have the symptoms of frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger from elevated blood glucose levels. Untreated, diabetes can cause many complications some of which could even be lethal. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects that the diabetes cases worldwide will rise from 217 million in 2005 to 366 million by 2030.Populations of both types of diabetes are rapidly increasing. This course gives a brief introduction on current situations of diabetes and its prevention and state-of-art new technologies for diagnostics. Some hand-on experiments are also expected to show the students how to measure blood glucose levels at home using point-of-care devices


B3652: Small things make big differences: how nanotechnology changes our lives? in Splash! Spring 2014 (Apr. 12 - 13, 2014)
Nano science is the subject that investigates extremely tiny things. Nano is a controlled matter typically ranging from 1-100 nanometers (10^-9 m) where their unique properties enable novel applications. They are so small that even regular microscopy can hardly visualize them. Are there any such tiny things around us and affect our lives? We can't even live without some of them? This class gives a brief introduction to the world of nanotechnology and unveils the unnoticeable nano-related things in our lives, with some hands-on experiments.