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Splash Spring 2019 is May 4-5, 2019!

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ESP Biography



JORDAN MOLDOW, ESP Teacher




Major: Software Engineering

College/Employer: Box

Year of Graduation: 2014

Picture of Jordan Moldow

Brief Biographical Sketch:

Not Available.



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

E4038: How This Website Works in Splash Fall 2014 (Nov. 08 - 09, 2014)
Ever wonder what was actually going on when Splash registration opened? Find out how the Splash website (or any website) works behind the scenes. We’ll cover, very briefly, the basics of all the major concepts of web design, including HTML, CSS, client-side scripting, and server-side scripting. Time permitting, we'll also talk about databases, version controlling, and caching. All examples will be taken from the Splash website. If time allows, we’ll take a look at some of the administrative portions of the website - the pages that help the Splash directors administer the program. This class will be an overview of many different concepts of web design, and how they interact. It will not be an in-depth look at any one concept, though links to resources for additional learning will be provided. No computer experience is required. In fact, if you have a lot of computer experience, you’ll probably be bored. But if you don’t already know most of the terms listed in the description, then you’re encouraged to register for this class!


M4039: Live Action Cryptography in Splash Fall 2014 (Nov. 08 - 09, 2014)
Send secure messages to your friends, in such a way that I can't possibly figure out the message you are sending. We will do some exercises to demonstrate various real-life cryptographic systems. Though these concepts are heavily used in modern day security, they are also very simple to implement, and can be done with paper, pen, and calculator, as we shall do. We will cover: - One Time Pads - Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange - ElGamel Public Key Encryption - RSA Public Key Encryption


M4064: Intro to Algorithms in Splash Fall 2014 (Nov. 08 - 09, 2014)
An algorithm is a list of instructions that helps you accomplish a particular task. Something as simple as sorting a list of numbers can be described as an algorithm! If we were to ask you and a friend to tell us how to sort numbers, you might not come up with the same answer. In the science of algorithms, there is no single correct answer. Multiple algorithms can all come up with the same sorted list, though they may differ in how efficient they are or how easy they are to understand. We will talk about what algorithms are, how you design algorithms, and how you evaluate algorithms to find the best one to get your job done fast!


E3713: How This Website Works in Splash! Spring 2014 (Apr. 12 - 13, 2014)
Ever wonder what was actually going on when Splash registration opened? Find out how the Splash website (or any website) works behind the scenes. We’ll cover, very briefly, the basics of all the major concepts of web design, including HTML, CSS, databases, client-side and server-side scripting, servers, version controlling, and caching. All examples will be taken from the Splash website. If time allows, we’ll take a look at some of the administrative portions of the website - the pages that help the Splash directors administer the program. This class will be an overview of many different concepts of web design, and how they interact. It will not be an in-depth look at any one concept, though links to resources for additional learning will be provided. No computer experience is required. In fact, if you have a lot of computer experience, you’ll probably be bored. But if you don’t already know most of the terms listed in the description, then you’re encouraged to register for this class!


E3717: How to Make a Calculator (on paper) in Splash! Spring 2014 (Apr. 12 - 13, 2014)
How does your calculator work? Surprisingly, the answer is not "magic". Rather, basic calculators only need two things: a voltage source, and some circuit elements. Even your computers use this simple technique to perform arithmetic! In this class, we will discuss all of the core concepts needed to make a calculator, or arithmetic unit. We will also design our own calculator circuit diagrams on paper. We will start by lerning binary arithmetic. While you may be used to decimal arithmetic (where numbers use the digits 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9), in order to effectively harness the power of electricity, we must do arithmetic with only two digits, 0 and 1. Then we will do computations on binary numbers in useful ways, using boolean logic gates, which have analogous circuit elements in real-life computers. Finally, after some practice, we will put all of our gates together to make a binary number adder. No background in binary numbers, logic, or circuits is necessary. This class will teach everything you need to know in order to design your adder.