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Splash Spring 2019 is May 4-5, 2019!

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ESP Biography



MARY MARKLEY, Stanford freshman, prospective linguistics major




Major: Not available.

College/Employer: Stanford

Year of Graduation: 2022

Picture of Mary Markley

Brief Biographical Sketch:

I'm a freshman from Burlington, Vermont. I'm hoping to major in linguistics and possibly German, but I'm also interested in evolutionary biology and cognitive science. When I'm not browsing Wikipedia’s rabbit holes, I like watercolor painting, listening to nursery rhymes in other languages, and making stuff in the woods. Talking to people who are interested in things is really fun, and I love the chance to do that at Splash :)



Past Classes

  (Clicking a class title will bring you to the course's section of the corresponding course catalog)

H7249: Linguistic Archaeology in Splash Spring 2019 (May. 04 - 05, 2019)
Proto-Indo-Europeans lived in the late Neolithic period and left very little archaeological evidence. But we do know very specific things about them—their patrilineal society, their focus on animal husbandry, their lack of understanding of silver smelting. How? Their words. No one speaks their language today, but we do have reconstructions of their words based on languages that descended from Proto-Indo-European—languages as diverse as Bengali, Armenian, and English. Archaeology’s not just digging in the dirt. Come explore how old words can be put together to make discoveries, and how regular sound changes can tell us what words people were using thousands of years ago. We will reconstruct words and show how they can be adapted to fit other languages.


H6795: Linguistic Archaeology in Splash Fall 2018 (Dec. 01 - 02, 2018)
Proto-Indo-Europeans lived in the late Neolithic period and left very little archaeological evidence. But we do know very specific things about them—their patrilineal society, their focus on animal husbandry, their lack of understanding of silver smelting. How? Their words. No one speaks their language today, but we do have reconstructions of their words based on languages that descended from Proto-Indo-European—languages as diverse as Bengali, Armenian, and English. Archaeology’s not just digging in the dirt. Come explore how old words can be put together to make discoveries, and how regular sound changes can tell us what words people were using thousands of years ago. We will reconstruct words and show how they can be adapted to fit other languages.